Aaron Sorkin has a very impressive list of writing credits to his name. Most prominently, he wrote the hit Facebook dramatization The Social Network, but the man is also responsible for A Few Good Men, Moneyball, The West Wing and the wildly underloved yet brilliant Sports Night. He’s a good writer, is what we’re saying, and this morning’s news that the Steve Jobs biopic in development at Sony Pictures had tapped Sorkin to craft the screenplay for the film instantly skyrockets our interest in the eventual product.

It should be noted that this particular Steve Jobs movie is not the Steve Jobs movie starring Ashton Kutcher that we wrote of a few days ago. As far as we know that film has no writers who could be considered “Hollywood darlings,” and is mostly being sold on the idea that Ashton Kutcher resembles the late CEO. Sort of.

Also unlike the Kutcher film, Sony’s biopic has yet to start casting, so really, the only thing we know about it is that it will be written by a man known for his sharp, smart dialogue, interesting, complex characters and ability to create compelling drama from the tedium of the tech industry.

As for the focus of the film, the official announcement states that Sorkin’s screenplay will be an adaptation of Walter Isaacson’s 2011 biography of Jobs, aptly titled Steve Jobs. The book was a massive hit both with consumers and critics, and sold over 2 million copies last year. Though the book was a relatively standard non-fiction biography, it remains to be seen what Sorkin will do with it. His retelling of the creation of Facebook is widely agreed to be rather fanciful in its depiction of reality, so it’s entirely possible that Sorkin might alter certain events in Jobs’ life in the interest of creative license.

Of course, Sony Pictures has eminent confidence in Sorkin’s abilities. Co-chairman Amy Pascal had this to say of the man: “There is no writer working in Hollywood today who is more capable of capturing such an extraordinary life for the screen than Aaron Sorkin; in his hands, we’re confident that the film will be everything that Jobs himself was: captivating, entertaining, and polarizing.” All cynicism aside, we’re likewise very interested in what Sorkin might do with this script. He’s yet to create anything bad, and the vast majority of his stuff is straight up fantastic, so here’s hoping his Steve Jobs biography lives up to his past standards.