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Apple accepts its punishment, says Samsung didn’t copy the iPad’s design

Apple UK JudgementWhen Apple lost a court case in the UK, where it accused Samsung of copying the design of its iPad tablet, it was ordered to publish a statement confirming the outcome of the trial on its website. This was to help avoid Samsung’s reputation being damaged by Apple’s overzealous litigation around the world.

Apple appealed the decision, saying that not only would such a statement ruin the look of its website, but also that it had no wish to start advertising for its competitor in its own “shop window.”

Earlier this month, the appeal was turned down, and Apple’s punishment stood, albeit with a few changes. The statement would still have to be printed on its website, but it could be placed elsewhere with only a link appearing on the homepage, and the initial six month period was reduced to a month instead.

Today, that link and webpage have gone live. By visiting the UK branch of Apple.com, you’ll find the link, named “Samsung/Apple UK Judgement,” next to the region selector at the very bottom of the page, alongside such often visited links including “Use of Cookies” and “Privacy Policy.”

Click it and you’re taken to an apple.com URL called “legal-judgement,” except you wouldn’t know it was an Apple page if you didn’t check the address bar in your browser, as there is no branding and no return link to Apple.com. It’s a white page with five paragraphs of text in the center.

Yep, five paragraphs. All Apple was required to publish was a statement provided by the UK courts, and a link to the official case documentation. However, Apple has also added a few other quotes from the trial too, such as a glowing review of the iPad’s design and the Judge’s comment that Samsung’s tablets are simply “not as cool” as Apple products.

It also mentions the recent $1 billion judgement in the US, and a similar patent trial in Germany, which had the opposite outcome.

The statement will remain on Apple’s website for now, and it’ll be joined by print advertisements — presumably featuring the same statement — in several UK daily newspapers and technology magazines soon.