Samsung in Australia has been quick to capitalize on the recent Maps embarrassment suffered by Apple when cops in the country warned motorists against using the Cupertino company’s software because of “potentially life-threatening” data inaccuracies.

As reported by Cnet, the Korean tech giant had a little dig at Apple in downtown Sydney this week, setting up a tent and other bits of camping equipment alongside a muddied off-road vehicle. A sign placed in front of it read, “Oops, should have gotten a Samsung Galaxy S III. Get navigation you can trust,” pointing out that the S3 comes pre-loaded with Navigon Australia sat nav software, usual price $60.

The humorous ad comes days after police in the south of the country told motorists to avoid using Apple Maps for trips to the small town of Mildura in Victoria as the software was erroneously placing it inside a national park, 43 miles (70 km) from its real location. A number of travelers using Maps had reportedly become lost and stranded in the scorching hot national park. Police went so far as to say it could lead to a “potentially life-threatening” situation.

Following widespread coverage in the media, Apple moved quickly to fix the Mildura error.

Apple’s latest Maps-related embarrassment likely had more than a few Android users – who can use Google’s map app on their device – chortling with delight, but they should perhaps take note. Police in Melbourne have just piped up to say Google’s software is also causing problems for motorists. According to an ABC News report on Wednesday, Google Maps has been directing traffic down a narrow one-way track close to the country’s famous Great Ocean Road – which means all traffic, including trucks, buses and tourist vehicles.

Sergeant Nick Buenen told ABC News the track wasn’t built for heavy vehicles and that the error is a “significant safety issue for tourists and locals.”

Speaking of Google Maps, the Mountain View company released an all-new Maps app for the iOS platform overnight after the old one was removed by Apple in September.

[Images: Cnet Australia]