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A legend reborn: Indian’s Scout Sixty is an entry-level ode to the open road

To say Indian Motorcycle has had a tumultuous history would be a major understatement. The brand was founded in 1901 — arguably making it America’s first motorcycle company — and it enjoyed a significant amount of early success, growth, and technological breakthroughs. After World War II took its toll, however, its spot as America’s number one bike manufacturer was snatched up by Harley Davidson, and production eventually ceased in 1953. The nameplate was passed around by a variety of short-lived owners for years, but was eventually put down for good in 2003. Or so we thought.

Indian Motorcycle came back from the dead in 2006, and its 2011 acquisition by Polaris Industries gave it new life. A reliable parent company with financial stability meant that the brand could invest in new projects and technologies, one of which just dropped at the EICMA International Motorcycle Show in Milan, Italy.

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It’s called the Scout Sixty, an entry-level cruiser based on the Indian Scout that debuted in 2014. The bike shares its chassis, suspension, and brakes with the classically styled Scout, but it’s been fitted with a smaller, 61-cubic inch (999cc) V-Twin engine to bring the cost down and improve agility. With a starting price of $8,999 in Thunder Black, Indian hopes the Scout Sixty will introduce the company to a new group of customers.

“The Indian Scout has been a stunningly successful introduction for us, with balance, performance and maneuverability that appeals to a broad swath of riders here in America and around the globe,” said Steve Menneto, President of Motorcycles for Polaris Industries. “The new Scout Sixty expands that reach even further to include newer riders and a younger demographic who long to experience the legendary quality and craftsmanship of an Indian motorcycle.”

Indian Motorcycle Scout Sixty

As far as the specs go, the Scout Sixty creates 78 horsepower 64 pound-feet of torque in U.S. configuration, all of which is channeled to the ground via a five-speed gearbox. Dry weight is 542 pounds from the factory, but as usual, buyers can choose from a variety of add-ons to personalize their ride to their liking. The Scout Sixty is en route to dealerships now.