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Top dogs beware: BAC to take on Ferrari, Porsche with its own hybrid supercar

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BAC thinks its hypercar can take on the best Ferrari, McLaren, and Porsche have to offer, making things interesting for us.

The Briggs Automotive Company (BAC), the small British firm that gave us the marvelously minimalist Mono, is about to take things up a notch.

The company is planning a hybrid “hypercar” with a “seven-figure” price tag, founding brothers Neill and Ian Briggs said in a recent interview promoting the Wilton Classic & Supercar show.

The car they have in mind is a big leap from the Mono. Whereas that car is a small, open-cockpit single-seater, the hypercar will have a more conventional cockpit and two-seat layout, similar to likely rivals such as the Ferrari LaFerrari, McLaren P1, and Porsche 918 Spyder. Many current Mono owners have at least one of that holy trinity, according to the Briggs brothers.

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A panel of those current Mono owners will advise on the design of the hypercar. That design process is only in its first phase, so nothing is concrete yet. The Mono was designed with an emphasis on low weight and handling, but BAC’s next creation will need to add serious power to the mix in order to be considered a true hypercar.

One aspect of the hypercar mythos BAC already has covered is low-volume production. While the LaFerrari, P1, and 918 Spyder were limited editions for their respective brands, the BAC hypercar will be business as usual. BAC only builds two Monos per month, although it hopes to bump that up to five or six cars per month by 2020.

The hypercar is part of a newly enacted five-year plan that also includes updates for the Mono. BAC considers it to be as integral to the corporate identity as the 911 is to Porsche and so it plans to introduce performance and tech upgrades on a regular basis. BAC also wants to build an all-electric version of the Mono. Given that owners are expected to use the cars primarily for track days, Neill Briggs reasoned that range anxiety won’t be much of an issue.