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Gumpert’s Apollo Arrow is that 223 mph new hotness

When you think of Gumpert, images of gargantuan aerodynamic pieces and flared wheel arches most certainly come to mind, but so do their frightening performance figures.

The Gumpert Apollo made about 640 horsepower when it debuted in 2005 and would do an astounding 223.9 mph flat out. Its aggressively styled body, minimal curb weight, and roaring V8 engine earned Gumpert some serious street cred.

Sadly, the automaker couldn’t stay in the black and was forced to file for bankruptcy protection in 2013. Three years later, China’s Ideal Team Venture pulled the supercar manufacturer (and its founder — Roland Gumpert) from the ashes and at this year’s Geneva Motor Show, the brand was reborn with an all-new model and attitude.

Borrowing the name of its predecessor, the Apollo Arrow is unlike anything we’ve seen from Gumpert before … well, except again for its mammoth performance figures. Under its sculpted bodywork rests a 4.0-liter biturbo V8, courtesy of Audi, that delivers 1,000 horsepower and 738 pound-feet of torque. All those horses are channeled through a sequential seven-speed transmission and a Torsen self-locking differential.

1,000 hp may be impressive, but equally so is the Apollo Arrow’s curb weight of less than 2,866 lbs. The resulting performance is staggering. 0 to 60 mph takes just 2.9 seconds and top speed crests at 223 mph.

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The Apollo Arrow, therefore, has the performance chops to wear its Gumpert name proudly, but its design is a vast departure from the Lamborghini-esque insanity of yore. The Arrow’s body is sleek where its ancestors have been brash. Its aerodynamic components help keep the supercar stable at its performance limits, while its AP Racing brakes, Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, and adjustable sport suspension take care of the rest.

Though it must have been a great challenge, the Apollo Arrow is street legal while also meeting all FIA standards, meaning it’s ready for homologation in several racing series.

Official pricing hasn’t been announced, but the Apollo Arrow should cost less than $1 million.