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Nissan sends off the Y61-series Patrol by giving it more of what buyers crave

Nissan’s Australian division is bidding farewell to the last-generation Patrol, an off-roader originally introduced in 1997.

Named Y61 internally, the last-generation Patrol may not ring a bell because it was never sold on our shores. However, it was a hit in markets like Australia where rugged, body-on-frame SUVs remain popular. Strong sales convinced Nissan executives to market it alongside the newer, Y62-series Patrol that’s known as the Armada in the United States.

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Nissan is sending off the last-gen Patrol with a limited-edition model appropriately named Legend Edition that’s ready to tackle the punishing Australian outback. Based on the ST trim level, the special model brings a long list of Nissan accessories including an airbag-compatible bull bar, a winch, a tow bar, a roof rack, and a snorkel that allows it to safely drive through water. Inside, the Legend benefits from navigation and a rear-view camera.

Legend Edition graphics on both doors, a soft cover for the spare tire, and 17-inch alloy wheels add a finishing touch to the look. It’s offered in three colors named white diamond, polar white, and platinum. The vehicle is a lot more basic than its upmarket replacement, but it’s aimed at adventurers who put a bigger emphasis on tried-and-true off-road capacity than on creature comforts.

There are no mechanical modifications to report. Like the standard Patrol, the Legend Edition is equipped with a 3.0-liter four-cylinder turbodiesel engine tuned to deliver 158 horsepower and a solid 380 pound-feet of torque. A five-speed manual transmission comes standard, and a four-speed automatic is available at an extra cost.

Just 300 examples of the Nissan Patrol Legend Edition will be built, and all of them have been earmarked for the Australian market. Pricing starts at 57,990 Australian dollars, a sum that represents about $43,500. Selecting the automatic transmission adds 3,000 Australian dollars (roughly $2,200) to that figure.