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RCA renovates the AC plug, turns your outlets into charging stations

Sometimes the simple ideas are the best, and often times when a good product is announced, people will look at it and wonder why no one else thought of it before. Such is the case with RCA’s (in association with Audiovox, now known as Voxx Internaitonal) new line of USB-based charging solutions.

For those of us neck deep in the technological world, charging various devices has become the bane of our lives–especially when on the road. As the tech press of the world descends on Vegas for CES, even with the massive energy consumed by the city itself, there is still probably a spike in the power drain as the journalists all try to charge their phones, computers, e-readers, cameras, etc., etc. And then there is the fight for outlets themselves, which is a challenge for people with multiple devices.

One easy solution is to use USB ports for devices that can take charges that way. RCA decided to expand on that idea. The company has unveiled a new line of USB charging solutions, beginning with a USB Wall Charger Plate that replaces current dual slotted AC outlets with a single AC outlet, and a pair of USB charging ports that make charging your phone, MP3 player, e-reader, and the dozens of other power-hungry devices a simple task. The Wall Charger Plate will run just $19.99, and will hits stores immediately.

Along with the wall charger, RCA has unveiled a new series of alarm clocks that all feature USB ports as well. The top of the line alarm will run $49.99, feature two USB ports, and an area at the top of the clock to hold your devices.

In the same theme, RCA also introduced a series of nightlights that contain a USB charger. The nightlight plugs into a standard AC unit in the wall, then a USB device can be connected to the front. There are a handful of models, including one that glows blue for illumination, and also puts off an amber glow when a connected device is charging then goes off when fully charged.

Five years ago, the idea of a USB replacing an AC outlet would have bordered on ludicrous. Today it may just become the new standard for techies around the world.