With Lulz Security now on permanent hiatus, fellow hacker group Anonymous has filled in the gap with the release of a “counter-cyberterrorism” manual from the US Department of Homeland Security.

According to ABC News, which was first to sort through the 650 MB file posted to MegaUpload, the release was originally thought to have come from a certain private security firm whose website went offline soon after Anonymous released the data. It was later found that the information actually comes from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which originally produced the “Counter Terrorism Defense Initiative” training program in 2009.

Accordring to the program’s website (which has since been taken offline), the “SENTINAL” program — short for “Security and Network Training Initiative and National Education Laboratory” — “is a national initiative to educate technical personnel in cyberterrorism response and prevention.” The program was intended for employees of “public safety, law enforcement, state and local government, public utilities, colleges and universities, and health care providers.” And it “focuses on enhancing the prevention, preparedness, and response capabilities of local, state, tribal, and rural public safety jurisdictions.”

It does not appear that the release contains much that wasn’t already publicly available on the Internet. It does, however, provide a list of all the Federal Bureau of Investigation office locations throughout the United States. Other contents of note include stock letters for officially requesting user information from Internet service providers, and various hacking and coutner-hacking tools. In short, there’s really nothing much here that a determined person couldn’t have found without hacking a single thing.

Regardless of the value of the release, the action shows that the hackers are far from finished. This release is part of the “AntiSec” (anti-cybersecurity) campaign launched by Anonymous and LulzSec (before it disbanded). According to @AnonymousIRC, a 100,000-follower strong Twitter feed that reports on the group’s escapades, “all @LulzSec members” are onboard with the #AntiSec campaign.

While LulzSec claims that it planned from the beginning to remain a coherent group for 50 days before splitting up, some believe the hacker sect called it quits after a rival gang of hackers, A-Team, released what it claims are the identities and online properties of all of LulzSec’s members.