Home > Computing > Family sues school, claiming strong Wi-Fi signals…

Family sues school, claiming strong Wi-Fi signals made their son ill

Although many people have raised concerns over Wi-Fi networks being harmful to humans, in actuality there’s very little evidence to suggest that’s the case. If it were true, almost every wireless gizmo we use, from bluetooth headsets, to remote control cars, would have a similar potential. Still, that hasn’t stopped one Massachusetts family from suing their child’s school, over claims that its Wi-Fi network made their son ill.

However the family isn’t claiming that this is the same old wireless internet that most of us are used to, but a new ‘strong’ Wi-Fi network that the school installed in 2013. They claim it caused their son to begin experiencing nose bleeds, headaches, nausea and a variety of other symptoms. The school administrators deny this, and say that its wireless internet was found to be well within safe standards mandated by the federal government.

Despite this, the family is demanding that the school switch to wired ethernet connections only or reduce the strength of its wireless routers, as well as pay up $250,000 in damages.

Related: How dangerous is public Wi-Fi? We ask an expert

According to the suit, the child, referred to only as “G,” suffers from Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity Syndrome, which is not a currently recognised medical diagnosis; although sufferers – who are most commonly self-diagnosed – claim to feel the effects of electromagnetic fields. However, in most test cases, they have been unable to specify the difference between real and non-existent electromagnetic waves.

In this instance, a local physician claims to have diagnosed the child, however the school attests that no tests were conducted and wish to have a second opinion on the diagnosis. The family has refused to comply and says that if the suit is not recognised and their child properly catered to, they may need to pull the child from the school, which he has attended since 2009, according to The Telegram.