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Glassouse lets users control a mouse cursor with their eyes — and mouth

A new wearable may soon help people engage with electronics without having to use their hands. Users don the Glassouse like they would a pair of glasses. The device connects to electronics via Bluetooth and responds to head movements to manipulate a cursor around the screen. The mouth piece – which curves in front of the face like a headset microphone – functions as a button. Users can bite or click the button to select items on the screen.

The simple looking device was created by Mehmet Nemo, a young electrical engineer who was inspired by his handicapped friend’s difficulty using technology. After positive feedback to the prototype, Nemo and his team decided to launch an Indiegogo campaign to promote their product. The first 100 devices are available at $149 plus $30 shipping – about half the price of the proposed eventual sale price. And people who don’t need a Glassouse but want to contribute to the cause can purchase “non-profit” perks. Through these donations, Nemo and his team hope to maintain an affordable price for their device while giving away one Glassouse for every $70 donated.

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At just 1.6 ounces, the Glassouse is remarkably light and can apparently work for fifteen hours off a single charge. It’s currently compatible with Apple computers and most Android, Windows, and Linux devices, including TVs. Recognizing the wear and tear that the mouthpiece would experience, Nemo and his team subjected the button to 50,000 “clicks” and imply it was still operational.

The Glassouse is one of many assistive technology devices available for people with disabilities. For example, SmartNav is a popular device that attaches to the top of a computer monitor or laptop screen and uses an infrared camera to track head movements. These head movements allow for hands-free control of a cursor. However, SmartNav users still need to engage with keyboard hotkeys to select options on the screen. That’s where the Glassouse bite and click button really stands out.