Home > Computing > Apple’s latest iPad Pro ad touts it as a…

Apple’s latest iPad Pro ad touts it as a full-fledged computer

Apple rolled out a new ad on Monday touting the iPad Pro as a full-fledged computer.

The 30-second slot suggests you might want to ditch your laptop and go with the company’s most powerful tablet instead. Why? Because, according to the ad’s narrator:

Just when you think you know what a computer is, you see a keyboard that can just get out of the way. And a screen you can touch, and even write on. When you see a computer that can do all that, it might just make you wonder, hey, what else can it do?

Of course, your current computing habits may mean you have no need to scrawl on the screen with the iPad Pro’s Pencil, though casting aside the Smart Keyboard for some tasks is likely to appeal to users keen on mobility and weight savings.

There is, however, a myriad of other issues to consider when it comes to the idea of ditching your computer for a tablet like the Pro. Indeed, DT’s Gabe Carey took a close look at whether such a move was feasible. Despite the Pro’s undoubted power, he decided that limitations with both iOS and multi-tasking, as well as other factors, meant it’s not yet ready to replace his main machine. Carey admits, though, that he demands a lot from his computer, so for some lighter users the transition could certainly work out.

The smaller 9.7-inch Pro, launched by the tech giant in March 2016,  starts at $599 for the Wi-Fi-only 32GB configuration, while the 12.9-inch Wi-Fi only model kicks off at $799 with the same amount of storage.

Related: Why your laptop could look a lot like an iPad Pro

Data released Monday showed global tablet sales on the decline for the seventh straight quarter. However, while Apple saw a decrease in tablet sales for the second quarter of 2016, it actually experienced an increase in tablet-related revenue thanks to the higher cost of its two Pro tablets.

Apple’s entire range of iPads, which besides the Pro devices also include the Air 2 and Mini models, scored it $4.9 billion in revenue for its latest quarter, up from $4.5 billion a year earlier.

The company is currently the biggest seller of tablets with 25.8 percent of the market. Samsung sits second with a 15.6 percent share.