Home > Computing > Mozilla spars with Microsoft over WebGL security

Mozilla spars with Microsoft over WebGL security

WebGL general graphic

Last week, Microsoft raised some hackles in the Web development community by claiming that there was no way to implement the WebGL open 3D graphics standard in Internet Explorer without exposing users to unacceptable potential security risks.

WebGL is a 3D graphics environment build on OpenGL 2.0, used for many 3D games and technologies, and promises to bring hardware-accellerated 3G graphics support to Web browsers. Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox already support WebGL, and Opera and Safari are working on support. However, while Microsoft has made many strides with Internet Explorer 9—and is already showing off work on IE10— Internet Explorer offers no support for WebGL.

In a detailed posting, Microsoft outlined its primary reasons for considering WebGL a security risk: that WebGL exposes hardware functionality (e.g. video cards and processing) to Web content in an “overly permissive” way, that WebGL security servicing relies too heavily on third party components, and that today’s graphics systems were never intended to cope with shaders and 3D geometries that are specifically designed as attacks.

“We believe that WebGL will likely become an ongoing source of hard-to-fix vulnerabilities,” Microsoft wrote. “In its current form, WebGL is not a technology Microsoft can endorse from a security perspective.”

Microsoft also cited two reports from Context Information Security that outlined security issued in WebGL.

Not surprisingly, WebGL supporters take issue with Microsoft’s position, and leading the charge for the moment is Mozilla’s VP of technical strategy, Mike Shaver, who notes that Microsoft seems to overcome all of the concerns it has over WebGL in its own Silverlight technology. Although Silverlight uses Microsoft’s own Direct3D technology on Windows, on Mac OS X Silverlight taps into OpenGL in pretty much the same manner as WebGL.

I suspect that whatever hardening [Microsoft] applied to the low-level D3D API wrapped by Silverlight 3D can be applied to a Microsoft WebGL implementation as well,” Shaver wrote. “That Silverlight supports Mac as well, where these capabilities must be mapped to OpenGL, makes me even more confident.”

Shaver acknowledges security issues in WebGL are real—including bugs that impact Firefox’s WebGL implementation. However, Shaver argues these issues are like security issues in any other technology and are being addressed by a responsible ecosystem of partners and developers.

“It may be that we’re more comfortable living on top of a stack we don’t control all the way to the metal than are OS vendors,” Shaver wrote, “but our conversations with the developers of the drivers in question make us confident that they’re as committed as us and Microsoft to a robust and secure experience for our shared users.”

Get our Top Stories delivered to your inbox: