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NEC MultiSync PA231W 23-inch LCD display aims at graphics pros

NEC Display Solutions has unveiled its new MultiSync PA231W display, a 23-inch LCD display aimed at graphics professionals, photographers, and other folks who live and die by color accuracy. The PA213W features a 14-bit 3D lookup table for precise color calibration, and NEC’s DisplaySync Pro technology enables users to control two computers connected to the monitor with a single keyboard and mouse—and each computer can have its own color space—making the monitor an ideal space (and power) saver for graphics production environments.

“The addition of the MultiSync PA231W provides our customers with more options when it comes to choosing a professional-grade display for their workspace,” said NEC Display Solutions product manager Art Marshall, in a statement. “Key technologies in this product combined with eco-conscious features enable users to depend on their monitors for accurate color, great ergonomics and convenience.”

The MultiSync P231W features a full-HD 1,910 by 1,080 resolution with a 1,000:1 contrast ratio and 270 cd/m² of brightness. The display features that 14-bit 3D LUT for color calibration, along with 75.4 percent coverage of the AdobeRGB gamut, 96.6 coverage of the sRGB space, and 71.6 percent coverage of the NTSC color space. The monitor also packs NEC’s AmbiBright ambient light sensor to adjust the display’s brightness based on current lighting, a color vision emulation more to quickly preview colors that emulate particular vision problems, and an Eco Mode that enables users to define 50 and 75 percent backlighting levels and calculate power saves in watts per hour. The unit sports a DisplayPort input and two DVI-D inputs, along with VGA; there’s also a built-in USB hub that can support two computers and three devices.

Compared to other 23-inch displays on the market, the MultiSync P231W isn’t exactly cheap: it has an estimated street price of $679. But if you live in a color-critical world—or are tired of seeing your work come back from the printers looking all wonky—its technology might be a big help.