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Netragard stops selling exploits for fear of how they may be used

Digital security firm Netragard has announced that its controversial Exploit Acquisition Program (EAP) will be halted moving forward, after it was discovered that it had been selling exploits to Italian firm Hacking Team, which was recently found to be doing the same to regimes guilty of human rights violations. Although Netragard still believes zero-day exploits are important, it cannot continue to sell them without knowing their potential end-game usage.

“Our motivation for termination revolves around ethics, politics, and our primary business focus,” said Netragard CEO Adriel Desautels in a blog post. Although he said that it wasn’t the responsibility of a seller to determine what customers would do with their products, in light of what Hacking Team was found to be up to, it could no longer ethically continue selling them.

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The reason it’s possible for Netragard to do this, is because as Desautels points out, EAP isn’t the company’s many focus – even if it has proved a strong revenue stream.

While Desautels wants to pull Netragard back from the brink of being linked with Hacking Team’s immoral sales of exploits to countries headed by decried regimes, he did take a moment to defend the development and use of zero-day exploits. Highlighting how the FBI used a flaw in the Flash player in 2013 to help close a child pornography ring, he suggested that those that are against the use of such ‘tools’ were merely uneducated about them.

Moving forward, Netragard will only reintroduce its EAP system if a framework is put in place to regulate it better. However, Desautels did add the caveat that he didn’t want to see the practice of discovering these exploits restricted, as that would negatively affect those striving to improve software security around the world, he said.