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From 3D-printed cake toppers to camera drones, weddings are becoming high tech

Why it matters to you

If you're planning a high-tech walk down the aisle, you're not alone -- weddings are the latest cultural mainstay to adopt technology.

From GoPros hidden inside bridal bouquets to 3D printed cake toppers, tradition is meeting technology in the walk down the aisle. In a recent interview with Today, Kelly Gould, editor-in-chief at The Knot, shared that a third of all couples are now using tech for their wedding day, a number that is only expected to increase.

While booking a photographer has long been a part of the wedding planning process, aerial drone photography is becoming more common — as well as using a first-person perspective. One Boston bride, for example, hid a GoPro inside her bouquet to shoot that walk down the aisle.

More: Watch what can happen when you let a dog shoot your wedding video

Catering to guests now also sometimes means catering to their smartphones — more couples are choosing to offer a charging station at the reception. Smartphones have become so integrated into the wedding planning process, that now 89 percent of couples use them, according to the Knot. Mobile RSVPs are also on the rise at 16 percent, twice what those numbers were just two years ago.

Social media is also creating a pull, from custom hashtags to einvites. Wedding websites, a trend that popped up several years ago, is also becoming more common.

Technology’s influence on the wedding scene goes well beyond photography, custom hashtags and charging stations — that same Boston couple, Aman and Kelly Advoni, also 3D printed the groom’s tux and a replica of the couple — and their dog — to top the cake.

More: Thanks to these designers, you can now 3D print just about everything you need for a wedding

“I would say that planning our wedding with technology has definitely made it easier, and it just feels more like us,” bride Kelly Advoni said.

The trend also continues well into the reception, including robot bartenders.

“I think there’s an assumption that technology and tradition have to be at odds, and I think the reality is that they don’t,” Aman Advoni said. “I think technology and tradition can coexist well.”