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Introducing the emoji keyboard, for when typing out words gets too much

Although it may at first glance look as if someone’s dropped pizza all over it, closer inspection of this unique keyboard reveals not bits of food but instead lots of colorful, expressive emoji.

That’s right, we have here a Bluetooth keyboard aimed at the world’s emoji addicts, a keyboard that’ll save you oodles of time, a keyboard that could mean you’ll never have to type out another word using proper letters ever again.

No, the Emoji Keyboard is not the work of a bored teen with a set of coloring pens and time on their hands. It’s a real product, available to you and me for upwards of $80, depending on which version you plump for.

Related: What’s your favorite emoji? SwiftKey’s “United States of Emoji” reveals our habits

It’s simple. The more you pay, the more emoji you get. The cheapest option offers 47 common and current emoji, plenty to help you jazz up your messages, but not so many that you’ll be able to abandon the typed word entirely.

Hand over $90 and you’ll bag yourself 94 of the colorful characters, including the recently released and all-important middle-finger emoji, perfect for communicating with your enemies or for complaining to businesses whose services fall well short of expectations.

Emoji Keyboard Pro

Emoji Keyboard Pro

But wait, there’s more. Cough up $100 and you’ll have a keyboard plastered with more than 120 emoji, enough to communicate with friends entirely in pictures, though letter keys are also available in the unlikely event you’ll want to use them.

The Austin, TX team behind the wacky device promises you’ll be able to hunt down emoji 10 times faster than usual, with each one quickly accessible via one of the special keys located along the bottom of the keyboard.

Hopefully the Emoji Keyboard will enjoy more success than the Emojli app launched last year by two friends “as a joke.” Despite more than 60,000 downloads of the emoji-only messaging software, the pair decided to pull the plug on it in July because “very few people actually used it.”