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Never too early: Someone is already modding the unreleased Fallout 4

Fallout 4 releases this November, and developer Bethesda is committed to making the game accessible for the modding community. At this year’s E3, the studio announced that mods would be available to not just PC players, but Xbox One as well, and it looks like the Fallout community has wasted no time flexing its creative muscles — in fact, someone has already started modding Fallout 4.

In an interview with the Bethesda Blog, Peter Zaccagnino, who originally unveiled his plans for a “Rail Rifle” mod on the Fallout 4 forums last month, said he actually started working on his custom weapon “a day or two after the reveal trailer came out,” and he based the weapon’s design on the iconic MG42 machine gun from World War II.

Related: Dust off your Pip-Boy: Fallout 4 is coming, and it’s set in Boston

“When I saw how all the weapons in the game can be modded into different variants, my jaw dropped,” Zaccagnino tells Bethesda. He admits that he was “so engrossed with the weapon modding” in Fallout 4 that he hadn’t paid attention to the other modding capabilities it offers, but could potentially add a mount or turret for his Rail Gun in the future. If he finishes the final design for the Rail Gun before the game’s November 1o launch, he may even design a second weapon.

“I’ve always liked rail guns for some reason. In real life they’re incredibly powerful. The ones the Navy currently uses can fire from miles and miles away with extreme precision,” Zaccagninio says. With the improvements to the shooting mechanics in Fallout 4 from past games, it should be a ton of fun to try out.

Even without user-created content, Fallout 4 looks to offer one of the most customizable experiences the medium has ever seen. Nearly every piece of loot can be used to either alter your equipment or add components to your settlement, and the character creation tool offers a ridiculous level of detail — and having other characters say your actual name helps with the “immersion” that the industry so desperately craves.