It looks like Dan Aykroyd was right. For years he’s been telling us that Ghostbusters 3 was going into production, and for the most part we would collectively smile, nod and roll our eyes. It’s been 23 years since the last Ghostbusters movie, and since Bill Murray has repeatedly refused to participate it didn’t really seem like Ghostbusters 3 would ever actually be made. And yet, apparently the cast and crew begin shooting the film next summer.

At least, that’s the claim made by Deadline. In an unrelated story about a movie starring Tom Cruise and Kevin Costner and being directed by Ivan Reitman, the author happens to mention that Paramount didn’t want this film to go into production “in the small window that Reitman has before he is expected to finally get the long-gestating Ghostbusters reboot in front of the cameras next summer for Sony Pictures (sans Bill Murray).”

If that seems like hearsay, think of it this way: The author is talking about Paramount Pictures, and quoting their own representatives. This company happens to be producing that aforementioned  Costner/Cruise film, so they are director Ivan Reitman’s employers. Thus, if they expect him to be unavailable to shoot the movie he has contracted with them to film, it’s probably because Reitman has notified them ahead of time. If anyone other than the cast and crew were to know when Ghostbusters would start shooting, it would be Paramount.

So, with that established, what else do we know about this new Ghostbusters film? We already covered the “Bill Murray won’t be in it” bit, but it should be noted than both Harold Ramis and Dan Aykroyd are expected to return. We have to imagine that Ernie Hudson could use the pay day, so let’s also assume that he’ll be back as well. As for a plot, the most recent reports peg this as being a film in which the original Ghostbusters pass their knowledge and tools on to a new generation of Ghostbusters.

Taking that all at once, I’m reminded of the rumor that upon reading the Ghostbusters 3 script Bill Murray tore it up, then scrawled “no one wants to pay money to see fat, old men chasing ghosts” across the front. Dan Aykroyd denied this ever happened, but since the note was most likely directed at him, that makes a certain sort of sense. 

Readers, are you still holding out Aykroyd-esque levels of hope for this film, or are you on Murray’s side, wondering why anyone would want to see pudgy middle-aged comedians shooting lasers at ghosts?