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Remedy Entertainment will bring its unique brand of action to PlayStation 4

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Remedy Entertainment's next project will be its first on a PlayStation system in 14 years.

Finnish game studio Remedy Entertainment has aligned itself with Microsoft in recent years, developing the Xbox console-exclusive mystery thriller Alan Wake before creating Quantum Break, last year’s time-bending Xbox One game that was greeted with a mixed reception despite its unique take on time travel. But it appears that the days of Remedy ignoring the PlayStation 4 are nearly over, as the studio is bringing its technology to the console for a future release.

An unannounced project that the developer is currently referring to as “P7” will be the game releasing on PlayStation 4 as well as a “wider range of platforms” that likely includes the Xbox One and PC, as well. The game will make use of the Northlight engine used in Quantum Break, which allowed for extremely detailed faces and animations. The engine did struggle, however, with frequent texture loading issues, which Remedy said at the time were “a quirk” of the engine that could not be fixed in an update.

In addition to the secret project, Remedy is also assisting in the development of Crossfire 2, the sequel to the massively successful shooter from Korean publisher Smilegate. Remedy will bring its “unique blend of storytelling, memorable characters, and inventive gameplay to Crossfire‘s global audience,” according to a statement released by the developer last July.

Remedy Entertainment first gained recognition in 2001 with the release of the gritty neo-noir shooter Max Payne, which was followed by a similarly acclaimed sequel, Max Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne, in 2003. The franchise then went into hibernation for a number of years before receiving a third installment in 2012 — unlike the first two games, it was developed by Rockstar instead of Remedy, and sold below the publisher’s expectations, though it was still met with a positive critical reception.