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Is this real life? This video shows what Super Mario Run would look like in person

As the fastest-growing app of all-time, it’s no surprise that fans have taken their enthusiasm for Super Mario Run to the streets — quite literally in the case of YouTuber Devin Super Tramp. Known best for his series of Ultra HD parkour videos, Super Mario Run Meets Parkour in Real Life! in 4K! sees a real-life Mario impersonator run, jump, and roll his way to saving Princess Peach from a dubious gang of Shy Guys.

Just as in the smash-hit mobile game, you’ll see Mario pull off some insurmountable moves that we could personally only dream of. And just like Super Mario Run, you’ll need a constant Internet connection to watch this video too. When you’re done, you might find your curiosity piqued by Devin’s other videos, of which he has plenty. Everything from Mario Kart in real life, complete with the tragic Luigi death stare, to parkour Pokémon Go is present.

More: Mario creator Shigeru Miyamoto: ‘I’m a designer,’ not an artist

This video arrives just as Super Mario Run has been treated to a sensible helping of holiday cheer, complete with any number of winter-themed decorations. These include, but certainly aren’t limited to, a “sparkly snow globe” and of course a “sparkly Christmas tree.” It also added a more competitive angle to the game, introducing a new “Friendly Run” option for taking on friends’ scores without the need to expend rally tickets.

Super Mario Run is Nintendo’s third go at licensing its characters out for use on mobile, joining the likes of Miitomo and Pokémon Go before it. Unlike Pokémon Go, however, Super Mario Run was developed by Nintendo itself. The app was directed by Takashi Tezuku, designer of the original Super Mario Bros. for the NES as well as its sequels. Shigeru Miyamoto, meanwhile, assumed the role of producer.

In our first-impressions of Super Mario Run, we said that while the game “brings Mario to iOS with the clever level design and quick action you’d expect,” Nintendo has simultaneously “learned both the best and worst lessons from the space — and applied them with equal vigor.”