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Toshiba Portege R705 Review

Highs

  • Thin and light
  • Sturdy, stylish magnesium chassis
  • Standard optical drive
  • Comfortable supersized touchpad, firm keyboard
  • Capable Core i5 processor
  • Sharp 13.3-inch screen
  • Surprisingly loud speakers
  • Affordable price point

Rating

Our Score 8
User Score 0

Lows

  • Lacks biz staples like keyboard light, 180-degree hinges
  • Some intrusive preinstalled utilities
  • Reflective screen
  • Not enough grunt for all 1080p playback
Toshiba’s Portege R705 laptop is sharp at work, comfortable at play, and affordable enough for everyone.

Performance

You don’t carve an ordinary notebook down to an ultralight without making sacrifices, and typically, that means subbing an ultra-low-voltage (ULV) processor for the brawny, full-power versions found in chunkier notebooks. Toshiba makes no such swap. The Intel Core i5-460M chip in the Portege runs at a respectable 2.53GHz and delivers performance to match, helping the Portege R705 return a PCMark Vantage score of 4,850.

While reasonable, that’s a bit short of the 5,783 PCMarks we saw returned from HP’s EliteBook 8440p, another Core-i5-powered business notebook. In practical terms, the difference typically works out to milliseconds around the desktop, but some more intense tasks do suffer. For instance, the Portege wasn’t quite up to the challenge of 1080p YouTube video, which played reasonably well but hiccupped every few seconds. The 1366 x 768 screen almost makes this a non-issue, but 1080p output via HDMI and Intel’s wireless WiDi tech do mean you could reasonably bump up against the Portege’s playback limitations when using it as a media machine. Fortunately for Toshiba, more common codecs like H.264 played back fine in 1080p, meaning you could still expect to push high-def video to a TV without slowing it to a chug.

Boot time for the humble PC is good but not great: It reaches the desktop in about a minute, but Toshiba’s preinstalled apps will keep it from opening a browser window for another 15 seconds while the system rushes around loading them.

Obviously, gaming isn’t much of an option on the Portege without a discrete graphics card, but Intel HD graphics can handle most 2D and online games without issue.

Display

Toshiba’s slim, LED-backlit LCD musters above-average brightness and contrast for a display in this class, but like most notebooks these days, it hides beneath a glossy layer that’s prone to picking up sunlight and reflections that can obscure the image in the wrong lighting. It’s more a distraction than a barrier to usability, though; in the car and beside massive office windows, text remains readable. Colors look vibrant, if a little on the cold side out of the box, but Intel’s integrated graphics drivers make it easy enough to tweak to taste. Resolution of 1366 x 768 is about standard for a screen this size, short of the 1440 x 900 you can find on a MacBook Air, yet still totally adequate for most tasks short of side-by-side browsing.

Unlike many business machines, which get screens that yawn open until they lie flat, the R705 maxes out at 45 degrees from vertical. Travellers may miss the extra flexibility in cramped airplane quarters, but the current arrangement works for 99 percent of computing, and we give Toshiba credit for the sturdy hinges that keep the screen from wobbling or drooping.

Speakers

For its size, the Portege actually manages to throw some impressive sound. For most reasonably quiet settings, listening to a YouTube video or TV show on Hulu with the included speakers rather than digging out your ear buds is a perfectly viable option. Is it utterly devoid of any bass? Absolutely, but that’s par for the course, and the volume impressed us for a 13.3-inch book.

Keyboard and mouse

Toshiba gets it. After watching PC makers ignore Apple’s luxuriously sized notebook touchpads for years, we’re thrilled to see others finally taking note, including Toshiba with the R705. The matte black touchpad measures nearly 4 inches diagonally, gobbling up every smidge of space between the keyboard and front edge of the notebook. That makes it easy to locate, and even easier to navigate on, especially with multi-touch gestures like two-fingered scrolling enabled by default. The only fault comes from the buttons, which sport a dark chrome finish that’s prone to fingerprints, and make a startling click and clack on pressing down and releasing that’s sure to irritate a few roommates and fellow Starbucks customers sipping lattes as adjacent tables.

In contrast to the vocal track pad buttons, the Chiclet-style keyboard produces barely a whisper from quick typing. The design does leave it with shallower keystrokes than we typically prefer, but we liked the broad, spread-out keys and stiff-feeling keycaps. Just make sure to keep a lamp on: Unlike business notebooks, which typically offer an LED light, and high-end consumer notebooks, which typically offer backlit keys, the R705 offers neither, leaving customers quite literally in the dark when it comes to after-hours typing.

Battery life

Toshiba claims eight hours of battery life from the six-cell, 66-watt-hour battery included with the R705, but as with most notebooks, we never got there. With brightness up to a readable 80 percent or so and Wi-Fi enabled, you can expect more like an honest 4.5 hours to 5 hours. While well short of Toshiba’s carefully massaged estimate, we feel that’s totally reasonable for a machine with this form factor and power.

Conclusion

Business up front, party in the back. It’s an apt description for the R705, but throwing it in with mullets just feels wrong, so let’s call it a solid pair of khakis instead. Sharp at work, comfortable at play, and affordable enough for everyone. With the R705, Toshiba succeeds at bringing the build quality, power and no-nonsense styling of machines formerly reserved for business elites down to the masses, without clipping the essentials. Most consumers probably won’t even notice the few concessions quietly built into the Portege, making it a steal beside many of the shoddy plastic bargain ‘books it will share shelf space next to. At $800 on the street, comparable to many feeble, ULV-powered machines, the Portege manages to pack a wallop without doing the same to your wallet.

Highs:

  • Thin and light
  • Sturdy, stylish magnesium chassis
  • Standard optical drive
  • Comfortable supersized touchpad, firm keyboard
  • Capable Core i5 processor
  • Sharp 13.3-inch screen
  • Surprisingly loud speakers
  • Affordable price point

Lows:

  • Lacks biz staples like keyboard light, 180-degree hinges
  • Some intrusive preinstalled utilities
  • Reflective screen
  • Not enough grunt for all 1080p playback

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