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Apple court hearing requesting ban of Samsung products set for December 6

A US court will decide on December 6 whether Apple has justifiable grounds for a ban to be imposed on sales of eight Samsung handsets following the Cupertino company’s big win in the courts last week.

The devices, all smartphones, are:

– Galaxy S 4G

– Galaxy S2 AT&T

– Galaxy S2

– Galaxy S2 T-Mobile

– Galaxy S2 Epic 4G

– Galaxy S Showcase

– Droid Charge

– Galaxy Prevail

At the same hearing, Samsung will argue for the jury’s decision to be set aside, AllThingsD reports.

“Having considered the scope of Apple’s preliminary injunction request, the additional post-trial motions that the parties have already filed and will file, and the substantial overlap between the analysis required for Apple’s preliminary injunction motion and the parties’ various other post-trial motions, the Court believes consolidation of the briefing and hearing on the post-trial motions is appropriate,” Koh said in a written order released on Tuesday.

Last week Samsung was ordered to pay Apple $1.05 billion in damages after a nine-person California jury ruled unanimously that the Korean firm had willfully infringed on a number of Apple’s patents.

The decision came at the end of a trial that lasted almost a month, with both sides accusing each other of patent violation. Unfortunately for Samsung, the jury ruled that Apple had not violated any of its patents.

Following the conclusion of the case, Apple CEO Tim Cook issued a memo to his employees in which he said that the jury’s verdict sent a “loud and clear message that stealing isn’t right.” Samsung, meanwhile, called the verdict “a loss for the American consumer.”

Before the December 6 hearing, the two sides will face each other in court again on September 20 as Samsung attempts to have a US-based preliminary sales ban lifted on its Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet, a product which was found in the recent trial not to have infringed on any of Apple’s design patents.

For an overview on what last week’s trial verdict might mean for Android users, head over to here for a piece by DT’s mobile expert Jeffrey Van Camp.

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