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Poor BlackBerry: Android hits 60 percent market share while BB falls to 6 percent

IDC Worldwide smartphone market share for Q1 2012The IDC has released a new batch of smartphone market share numbers, and they don’t look good for Research in Motion’s BlackBerry brand, nor are things looking any more promising for Windows Phone. While Microsoft continues to cling to about 2.2 percent of the market, BlackBerry’s share has fallen from 13.6 percent of the market a year ago to just 6.4 percent today. And it’s not just that the smartphone market is growing faster than BlackBerry. Sales are down too.

Worldwide smartphone OS market share in the first three months of 2012 (compared to Q1 2011):

  • Android – 59 percent share with 89.9 million units shipped (145 percent growth)
  • iOS (iPhone) - 23 percent share with 35.1 million units shipped (88.7 percent growth)
  • Symbian – 6.8 percent with 10.4 million units shipped (60.6 percent decline)
  • BlackBerry – 6.4 percent with 9.7 million units shipped (29.7 percent decline)
  • Linux – 2.3 percent with 3.5 million units shipped (9.4 percent growth)
  • Windows Phone/Mobile – 2.2 percent with 3.3 million units shipped (26.9 percent growth) 

While these numbers are from a market research company and are not official, they’re likely very close. Unfortunately, BlackBerry is continuing to bleed users at an alarming rate, almost as fast as Symbian, which is an OS that Nokia has officially declared as dying. Hopefully BlackBerry 10 can reverse the trend, or at least stop the bleeding, for RIM.

Apple-iPhone-4SThe growth of Android is also stunning. Part of this has come from Samsung, which sucked up 45 percent of all Android sales in the quarter. Still, not long ago Android’s market share was about 50 percent. It’s amazing to see an OS reach such success in a crowded market. 

“The popularity of Android and iOS stems from a combination of factors that the competition has struggled to keep up with,” said Ramon Llamas, a research analyst with IDC. “Neither Android nor iOS were the first to market with some of these features, but the way they made the smartphone experience intuitive and seamless has quickly earned a massive following.”

Apple’s growth is massive as well, especially considering that there wasn’t much that was new about the iPhone 4S. We imagine sales will jump considerably once a new iPhone launches, as they usually do.

(One note on Windows Phone: These numbers don’t include sales of the Lumia 900, which went on sale in April. These numbers are for January – March 2012 only. The growth percent is calculated by comparing sales to the first three months of 2011.)