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Grab your marshmallows: Wet, Hot, American Summer makes a triumphant return on Netflix

It’s hard to believe it’s been almost 14 years since the cult comedy Wet Hot American Summer graced the screens. And naturally, who better to bring it back then Netflix?

The subscription video streaming service has begun filming an 8-episode limited series based on the popular film, reports Deadline. Back in 2001, the cast included an ensemble of now A (and some B) listers, from comedy queens Elizabeth Banks and Amy Poehler to heartthrobs Bradley Cooper and Paul Rudd; along with other big names like Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce, Christopher Meloni, and Molly Shannon. Other “Wet Hot” alumni such as cult-comedian pioneers Ken Marino and Joe Lo Truglio have also landed their own high-profile network series as of late.

The original movie was written by David Wain and Michael Showalter, and both have reportedly returned to work behind the camera, directing and executive producing for the series.

Wet, Hot American Summer is one of those rare gems that bombed horribly at the box office, then somehow over time picked up a cult following and became a hit. The most likely reason behind this particular flick is the later popularity of many of the actors who were in it – the cast reads like a cast list from Saturday Night Live, and every popular comedy flick made ever since. (Seriously, what hasn’t Elizabeth Banks been in?)

So what’s it about? Set in 1981, it follows a group of counselors on the last day of a fictional Jewish summer camp in Maine, Camp Firewood. Naturally, hilarity ensues as the summer comes to a close and the plot attempts to skewer nearly every cliche in the camp movie handbook. From hookup attempts to talent shows, to a pack of nerds preventing a dangerous piece of NASA Skylab from falling onto the camp, it’s not difficult to see why the film bombed — or why it gained such an avid fan base after said bombing.

And with almost all of the old cast returning for the reboot, according to Gizmodo, this one is poised to do well – no box office even needed.