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Jurassic World propels Universal to $5 billion in lightning-quick time

Jurassic World and its ferocious Velociraptors was finally dethroned by a pack of adorable minions at the box office last week, but the dinosaur action flick is still a monster at the box office. With sales today, the latest addition to the Jurassic Park franchise has now hit $600 million at the U.S. box office, according to Deadline. And Universal Studios isn’t complaining about the usurping, as both movies rest under the Universal umbrella, adding to a summer that has helped the studio reach $5 billion in an unbelievably short (not to mention record-setting) amount of time.

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Since it hit theaters on June 12, Jurassic World has been snapping up records like the Indominus Rex at the center of the story, much to Universal Studios’ delight. The flick, along with other hits like Furious 7 ($1.51 billion), and Fifty Shades of Grey ($569.7 million) helped the studio wrench the distinction of being the fastest studio to reach $5 billion in international box office sales from 20th Century Fox. The record was set in November of last year, so Universal’s speed is as freakish as that of its mutant dinosaur.

Of the coveted $5 billion, Jurassic World is responsible for $1.49 billion, a number that just won’t stop growing. Other records for the film include the coveted title of being the fastest movie to hit $1 billion in Hollywood history, as well as having the highest grossing weekend of all time at $524.4 million internationally, as reported by Variety.

The swiftness with which the Colin Trevorrow-directed thriller reached the $600 million mark domestically today was also — surprise, surprise — the fastest ever. As of now, Jurassic World has clawed its way up to the fourth spot on the highest all-time domestic box office chart, trailing Marvel’s The Avengers ($623.4 million), Titanic ($658.7 million) and Avatar ($760.5 million). Those films had better brace themselves, because their positions are looking more and more precarious.