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Crystal Pepsi to relaunch with a nostalgia-driven fest featuring Salt-N-Pepa, others

The days of the VHS tape may be officially gone forever, but those with a hankering for the early ’90s have something to look forward to yet: Crystal Pepsi is coming back, and the company is hiring some of the top stars of the era to celebrate it, according to Billboard.

The soft drink maker will throw a party to celebrate the rerelease of its clear-looking version of the brand’s flagship beverage — which hasn’t been available on store shelves in 23 years — by hosting a minifestival featuring Salt-N-Pepa, En Vogue, Biz Markie, and Lisa Loeb.

Related: The Pepsi phone is real, and here’s what it looks like

Billed as the Summer of ‘92 Concert, the party will mark the official relaunch of the nostalgia-steeped soft drink, which was crafted again after an outpouring of fans requested it be remade during a social media campaign last year.

“We’re not just trying to bring the product back, we’re trying to bring the ’90s experience back. It felt like the stars were aligned with Pepsi with this one,” said Pepsi Marketing Director Lina Lagos of the event. “We happen to have a very authentic connection to the ’90s with this quirky, iconic brand.”

Beyond the throwback tunes and presumably bucket-loads of free, fizzy clear liquid, the party will feature a video game arcade, a ’90s-themed “cut & style salon,” and a tetherball court.

Given the serious amount of nostalgia for the early 1990s floating around these days, it’s difficult to imagine this concert will be a hard sell to younger consumers — even if the majority of the millennial generation may have still been in diapers when the four headliners were banging out hits left and right.

The event will take place on August 9 at Terminal 5 in New York City, with tickets going on sale Wednesday. For more information, would-be attendees can check out Pepsi’s ’90s-themed website, which looks like something one might have made at home during the peak early-internet era.