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Microsoft’s Groove Music takes a hint from Spotify for its newest feature

As part of the unveiling of Windows 10 last year, Microsoft rebranded its Xbox Music service as Groove Music. While it has picked up its share of fans along the way, it isn’t exactly nipping at Spotify’s heels, but that doesn’t mean that Microsoft is going to give up on the service yet.

In a recent update released to Windows Insider users, Groove Music introduced a new feature aimed at helping users discover new music. Titled Your Groove, the feature takes a cue from Spotify’s Discover Weekly playlists, but introduces a few of its own twists on the formula.

One of the main advantages Groove Music has over other music services is that it can play your own MP3s from your OneDrive account. Your Groove can analyze these files, as well as what you’ve listened to via the music service, in order to make more personalized track listings. It also keeps track of any artist activity available on the web, offering up playlists built from your collection of bands that are on tour in your area.

Your Groove

You don’t need a Groove Music Pass subscription in order to use the new features, though playlists will only be generated using your existing music if you don’t have one. In the blog post introducing the new feature, Microsoft is quick to point out that this is an early look at the feature — it’s only current available to users opted-in to the “Fast Ring”of Windows Insider Preview builds — and that the developers have already got changes planned.

This isn’t the only recent improvement to Groove Music seen in a Windows Insider Preview build. Last month, a new build gave Cortana the ability to play music from Groove Music itself, including songs only available with a Music Pass subscription; playback had previously been limited to songs either stored locally or in a OneDrive account.

There is no word on when – or even if – this feature will come to mobile versions of the Groove Music app, but it doesn’t seem likely that the feature would remain Windows-only forever.

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