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Adobe hires former Shutterstock VP to run its new stock photo service

Adobe Stock, the photo service Adobe recently launched, has brought onboard Scott Braut, formerly Shutterstock’s VP of content, as its head of content for Creative Cloud’s content strategy and operations.

According to an interview with Braut posted on the Adobe blog, his duty will be to expand Adobe’s already impressive collection of images, illustrations, videos, and other creative properties, as well as to support the artists behind that content. Braut is excited about the change, calling it a great chance to work with the planet’s biggest group of content creators and customers.

Related: Adobe brings curtain down on Photoshop Touch

He’s also quick to point out that Adobe unique position in the industry enables it do to things other companies can’t. Adobe has an enviably large community buttressed by a complete platform for creative talent, analysis, tools, and collaboration. Thanks to Creative Cloud, customers now have the chance to efficiently license pre-existing content to add into their projects.

Vectors at iStock

Companies are experiencing a transformation when it comes to content creation, according to Braut. Whereas content production used to only be the responsibility of a firm’s marketing and editorial departments, today, it’s more of a company-wide function. This has also led to an emphasis on high-quality content as well as on storytelling, which is quite understandable. The more content that is out there, the more hard-pressed companies are to make their own content stand out from the competition.

In his two decades in marketing and licensing, Braut has seen it all. One thing that still piques his interest, though, is something that’s still in the R&D stage, specifically augmented-reality apps or virtual retina displays. These involve images that are projected right into the retinas of users’ eyes. Braut explains that this exciting technology gives people a window into how content may be consumed in the not-too-distant future.