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Can’t tell a zoom lens from a telephoto? Canon website shows you what to look for

Even though more and more people are stepping up to interchangeable lens cameras like DSLRs and mirrorless CSCs (compact system cameras), there is the issue that many of these users never venture beyond the automatic setting or upgrading their kit lens that came with the camera – which means they aren’t really stepping up. Manufacturers are aware that educating their consumers is key if they ever hope to move their cameras and lenses. You’re starting to see more instructional videos, from the likes of Nikon and Olympus, that teach you how to take professional-looking photos. As for lenses, Canon launched a new website, Explore Lenses, that’s dedicated to helping newbies pick out the right lenses.

While kit lenses aim to be one-size-fits-all, there are scenarios that call for different glass that deliver stunning quality. That, of course, is the beauty of having the ability to swap out lenses, and having the appropriate glass could help you achieve some great images. For newbies, however, picking the right lens can be daunting, especially if they don’t understand all the nomenclature. Canon, which makes a lot of lenses, helps these new users decipher all those long-winded lens names by introducing the features of a particular lens, what it’s good for, and quick tips on how to use it. There are videos too, to help you visualize all the details (like the one about tilt-shift, below).

Divided into Zoom, Macro, Telephoto, Prime, STM, Wide-Angle, Tilt-shift, and Fisheye – all the lens categories that Canon offers – Canon describes each in the simplest terms, and recommends select models to help you attain a certain type of image. For example, to get up-close to a ladybug, Canon suggests using an EF-S 60mm f/2.8 macro lens. While Canon recommends lenses from its lineup, the info could be adapted for any brand.

Of course, there are a lot more to lenses and photography than what’s mentioned on the site, as it’s all very basic (check out our lens-related articles for more, here and here). The website is designed to be an intro to lenses, but it’s a quick and useful resource to help new users feel less intimidated about their equipment, and hopefully get them to explore more about their lens options.

(Via The Phoblographer)