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Cosina brings 3 lenses to Sony mirrorless cameras, including record-setting 40mm f/1.2

Why it matters to you

The trio of manual-focus primes are made for modern Sony E-mount cameras and support EXIF data and in-body stabilization.

At CP+ 2017, Cosina revealed plans to make three Voigtlander lenses for cameras using Sony’s E-mount, including Alpha-series mirrorless cameras and cinema cameras like the FS5 and FS7. While the lenses are fully manual, they will facilitate electronic communication to the camera body to provide support for in-body image stabilization, EXIF metadata, and automatic image magnification when focusing. The lenses are all full-frame compatible.

All of the lenses feature a classic all-metal body with two of the new lenses being from the fast-aperture Nokton series, including an 40mm f/1.2. The latter is the fastest full-frame 40mm ever produced, according to Cosina. It features a minimum focusing distance of 16 inches and is designed to provide edge-to-edge sharpness. Of particular interest to video shooters, the aperture ring can be switched into a silent, step-less mode that allows smooth iris changes without an audible clicking noise, according to DPReview.

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The 35mm f/1.4 is patterned after the classic M-mount version, but uses an updated optical formula redesigned for Sony digital sensors. Interestingly, it is built to include aberrations when shot wide open in order to produce a more charactered bokeh. Stopped down, the sharpness will naturally increase.

Finally, Cosina showed off the final version of the APO-Macro Lanthar 60mm f/2 that it originally announced at Photokina last September. With a minimum focus distance of 12.2 inches, this lens features a reproduction ratio of 1:2 to detailed close-ups. That’s not the strongest magnification ratio out there, but the bright f/2 aperture is a unique feature not often found on similar macro lenses.

While all three of the above lenses were on display at CP+, Cosina has not yet released information on when they will be available to the public — or how much they will cost. Not all Sony users will look to put such an “old school” lens on their high-tech digital cameras, but those after a classic shooting experience definitely have something to look forward to.