LinkedIn wants you to stick around a while next time you visit. “LinkedIn Today,” a public page where users with similar interests can view the same content, was the social network’s the latest attempt to get its professional users to talk to one another and share. It was then given a Pinterest-inspired face lift, changing the look and feel of the page into tiles of news. Now, LinkedIn’s interest in Pinterest is yet more apparent. You can comment on articles, like them, save them, or share them with others. 

A new feature called “Trending in Your Network” adds flexibility, letting LinkedIn users view trending news stories shared by their LinkedIn connections, regardless of what industry they’re in.

“This initiative was driven by one of our key design principles to simplify the experience; creating an elegant, delightful, and customized experience for news consumption,” said Ryan Roslansky, Head of Content Products at LinkedIn, in a statement. “These two new features, together with the existing customizable news feed, allow members to not only narrow down the most timely and relevant information needed when needed, but to also gather valuable insights about other like-minded individuals within their professional networks and beyond.”

Though it is essentially still a resume network, LinkedIn has continually sought ways to increase its user engagement and time spent on the site, hoping to grow its revenue outside of mere subscriptions and banner advertising. It has implemented targeted advertising throughout the site, but wants more.

Unlike Twitter, Pinterest, and Facbeook, LinkedIn has never been seen as a platform where users can read user shared content, but due to the niche demographic of working professionals that LinkedIn caters to, this could be an opportunity. LinkedIn could differentiate itself as it encourages users to share content related to each user’s professional industries. It could become a reliable and professional curation platform where Justin Bieber or political news don’t have to appear in your newsfeed (assuming you’re not interested in Justin Bieber or politics). With Twitter and Facebook, your feed is determined by your friends. On LinkedIn, it could be driven by areas of expertise.

LinkedIn boasts a worldwide user base of 161 million, with 40 million of those users located in the United States.