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Panasonic Toughbook

We haven't had a chance to fully test this product yet, but we've assembled this helpful overview of relevant information on it.

Panasonic’s Toughbook tablet is a tablet that is aimed specifically at the business community and people who work in the field. The 10.1 inch screen isn’t glossy like many tablets. Instead Panasonic says that the screen will be daylight readable instead of wiping out like many LCD screens do in the sunlight. It does have 3G/4G connectivity if you desire it. It runs on an Android operating system. It’s also supposed to have a swappable battery. With the Toughbook brand Panasonic is shooting for a rugged tablet that can take a bit of a beating, which again, adds to the business field aim here.

Features List:

– 10.1 inch screen

– Daylight ready screen

– Optional 3G/4G connectivity

– Rugged Design

– Android operating system

– Bluetooth, WiFi

– Camera

Press Release

June 16, 2011 – Panasonic Solutions Company, provider of collaboration, information-sharing and decision-support solutions for government and commercial enterprises, today announced its plans to deliver an enterprise-grade Android™ tablet to the market in the fourth quarter of this year. The new Toughbook® tablet will address a current gap by delivering a product designed with security, functionality and real-world reliability in mind. By delivering this purpose-built business solution, the new Toughbook tablet will appeal to a wide variety of users, including mission critical government personnel, highly mobile field forces, SMB’s looking for a competitive edge, security conscious IT managers and bottom-line focused CFOs.  “Enterprise customers are very interested in the tablet market, but have been frustrated by the lack of appropriate solutions,” said Rance Poehler, president, Panasonic Solutions Company. “The vast majority of tablet devices—regardless of the OS—are engineered for consumers and don’t offer appropriate levels of security and durability or the functionality needed for business use. Like all Toughbook products, our Toughbook tablet will be designed and constructed with the mission-critical mobile user in mind.” From a functionality standpoint, the Toughbook tablet will avoid the typical glossy screens—found on current tablet offerings—that are all but unreadable in outdoor environments. The Toughbook tablet will include a high brightness, daylight viewable screen so that mobile workers, in markets like field service, home healthcare and public safety, can easily see critical data and operate the device regardless of lighting conditions. The new tablet will also include an active stylus, allowing mobile workers in sales, customer service and mobile point-of-sale environments to capture signatures on the device’s 10.1” XGA multi-touch display. Enterprise-class mobile computing requires a heightened level of device security that is not currently available in today’s tablet market. To address this need, the new Toughbook tablet is being designed with security embedded at the hardware level. The Toughbook brand is widely known for its reliability and durability, even in extreme operating environments. The new Toughbook tablet will be no exception, offering durability, and ingress protection consistent with its other fully-rugged devices.  Panasonic Toughbook to Address Market Void by Delivering Enterprise‐Grade Android TabletPanasonic Toughbook to Address Market Void by Delivering Enterprise‐Grade Android TabletOther features to be offered on the Toughbook tablet include satellite-based GPS, full-shift battery life, professional-grade accessories and optional embedded 3G/4G mobile broadband connectivity. Combined with mobile broadband connectivity, the Android-based Toughbook tablet will offer quick access to applications and data that could significantly improve a field worker’s ability to make critical decisions that enhance customer service, improve response times and deliver results. The device is being shown at Panasonic’s InfoComm booth (3829) in Orlando, FL. InfoComm runs through Friday, June 17. Follow the Toughbook® Brand The Panasonic Toughbook brand can be followed on various social media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr and Toughbloggers.com. About Panasonic Solutions CompanyPanasonic Solutions Company empowers people whose jobs depend on reliable technology. The company delivers collaboration, information-sharing and decision-support solutions for customers in government, healthcare, education and a wide variety of commercial enterprises. Products and services within the company’s portfolio include Panasonic Toughbook mobile computing solutions, projectors, professional displays (including both plasma and LCD), and HD

Digital Trend’s Tablet Buying Tips:

Apps

Apple’s App Store is more robust at this point than Google’s Android Market, and has more apps customized for larger tablet screens. Before you buy, it’s a good idea to search for a few apps that you consider high priority.

Screen Size

How portable does your tablet need to be? How large do you want your screen? The Samsung Galaxy Tab has a 7-inch screen, while the iPad has a much larger 9.7-inch screen. With tablets, the choice is more crucial, because size is the only thing that separates them from smartphones like the iPhone and Droid. Some reviewers have argued that Samsung’s Galaxy Tab is too small, and isn’t usable for many tasks above those that 3- or 4-inch smartphones already perform competently. Steve Jobs made the same argument when explaining why Apple chose a 9.7-inch screen size. Our advice: The best way to settle on size is to visit a nearby AT&T or Verizon store and try out both devices for yourself.

What are tablets?

Tablets are small touch computers meant for a broad array of tasks. Though some are marketed for specific purposes, tablets are meant to be good at a number of things including e-book reading. Though Microsoft failed to get stylus tablet PCs to take off eight years ago, Apple reinvented the category this year. Thanks to the overnight success of the iPad, tablets have begun to pop up everywhere. Modern tablets usually have a full-color LCD touchscreen measuring between seven and 10 inches diagonally, are great at video and Web-related tasks like e-mail, can install applications, and run on smartphone operating systems. Due to a lack of a physical keyboard, these devices are better for consuming entertainment than creating it. The Apple iPad, Samsung Galaxy Tab, and HP Slate make up the first generation of touch tablets. If you have a strong hankering to browse the web, stream movies & TV, check your email, download apps, play Angry Birds, or look at anything in color, a tablet is probably best for you.

Wi-Fi or 3G?

Internet access is vital to tablets. As cool as these gadgets are, without the Internet, they can’t do much of anything.

Though Wi-Fi versions of most tablets are available, getting an always-on 3G connection is expensive. On most carriers, 3G access will run you about $30 a month for 5GB of “unlimited” data. On a tablet, it isn’t difficult to download 5GB of images, audio, and video from the Web in a month. AT&T is worse, offering only 2GB of data for $25 a month. Some carriers are even offering a $200 discount on the Samsung Galaxy Tab if you sign a two-year 3G contract. Before signing up for a plan like this, ask yourself if the $200 savings is worth the cumulative $720+ you’ll pay while locked into contract. Two years is a long time, especially in the tablet market.

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