Edward Snowden

2014 was the biggest year for malware yet

2014 has proven itself to be one of the scariest years on record for malware, and the trend of mobiles, desktops and laptops getting infected with all manner of net nasties doesn't look to be slowing down anytime soon.

Computing

Snowden says that you should avoid Dropbox, Facebook, and Google

Edward Snowden has been speaking to The New Yorker (via remote video call, of course) about the privacy concerns he has regarding popular Web services such as Google, Facebook and Dropbox.

Computing

New NSA report shows the huge number of non-targeted users caught in its net

After a four-month investigation, the Washington Post reveals details of how many "innocent bystanders" are caught up in the NSA's data collection net as it monitors targets at home and abroad.

Computing

The NSA might know what you look like, collects millions of digital images per day

The National Security Agency (NSA) has ramped up its collection of digital facial images in the past four years, according to The New York Times, citing documents leaked by Edward Snowden. The agency is using software to glean “millions of images per day."

Web

Washington’s plans to ‘end’ NSA telephone metadata collection: What you need to know

Both the Obama administration and members of the House have plans to 'end' the NSA's collection of telephone metadata – some of it good, some of it dangerous. Here's everything you need to know.

Mobile

As Snowden roams free in robot form, our cyborg future has arrived

From a remote location in Russia, Edward Snowden used a Beam telepresence robot to do an on-stage interview at the 2014 TED Talks in Vancouver. In other words, our cyborg future is here.

Opinion

The U.S. branded an ‘enemy of the Internet’

Joining nations such as Russia, China, Iran and Saudi Arabia, the United States of America has made it on to the Reporters Without Borders' 'Enemies of the Internet' list for the first time.

Web

Snowden is no hero, says Bill Gates

In a wide-ranging interview with Rolling Stone, Bill Gates says he doesn't have "much admiration" for Edward Snowden, and suggests Microsoft rather than Facebook could have bought WhatsApp.

Computing

NSA pretended to be Facebook in its effort to infect ‘millions’ of computers

As part of its efforts to install malware on “millions” of computers worldwide, the National Security Agency impersonated Facebook to trick targets into downloading malicious code.

Web

Snowden wants more security, but are we too lazy for more locks?

Snowden says the best way – perhaps the only way – to prevent mass government surveillance is through the use of widespread end-to-end encryption. He’s right, of course. But are words like "privacy" and "encryption" are holding back more locked-down…

Features

Edward Snowden at SXSW: Encryption is the answer to NSA surveillance

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden told the crowd at SXSW 2014 that better encryption tools are the best way to limit mass government surveillance, and called on the techologists in attendance to help create these tools.

Web

UK spies snooped on Yahoo users’ sexy webcam chats

British spies may have naked pictures of you. That's according to the latest Snowden doc reports, which show that the UK’s GCHQ intelligence agency covertly collected snapshots of millions of Yahoo users’ video chats between 2008 and 2010.

Web

On ‘The Day We Fight Back,’ can we knock the NSA the same way we stomped SOPA?

Can the Internet do to the NSA what it did to the Stop Online Piracy Act? The 'Day We Fight Back' campaign hopes the answer is yes. Unfortunately for us all, it seems more likely to be the opposite.

Opinion

British spies cyberattacked Anonymous hackers, Snowden docs reveal

The UK’s spy agency waged cyberattacks against the online chat rooms of Anonymous and LulzSec hacktivists, documents leaked by Edward Snowden reveal. And they used computerized “weapons” similar to those used by the hacktivists against their own targets…

Web

Angry Birds creator claims no Internet devices may be safe from NSA

A new batch of documents leaked by Edward Snowden show that the National Security Agency and GCHQ, its counterpart in the UK, have been working to develop ways to access a wealth of personal data through so-called “leaky” apps.

Mobile