How T-Mobile plans to use 5G to challenge traditional ISPs

In June, T-Mobile announced its plans to merge with Sprint to form the “New T-Mobile.” As part of that merger, the new company will leverage the power of 5G to challenge traditional internet service providers (ISP) such as Comcast and Charter.

In a statement released to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), T-Mobile’s COO Michael Sievert detailed the company’s plans for providing broadband service. In his report, Sievert noted that 79 percent of American households have one or fewer options for high-speed internet, and that the New T-Mobile could provide a new service for these underserved communities, many of which are rural areas.

If these plans come to fruition, they would pose a major challenge to both Comcast and Charter. The FCC report noted that New T-Mobile would be able to provide service to 52 percent of ZIP codes across the country by 2024. This would let the company operate in 68 percent of Comcast’s territory and 64 percent of Charter’s.

Sievert predicted that over the course of the next six years, the New T-Mobile would become the country’s fourth largest ISP, with 1.9 million customers by 2021 and 9.5 million by 2024. Sievert also noted that the New T-Mobile would be of particular interest to customers located in rural areas due to their limited options.

“Of particular importance, T-Mobile estimates that 20-25 percent of its in-home fixed wireless subscribers will be located in rural areas where there is limited broadband availability,” the company’s statement reads. “Rural consumers should be particularly attracted to New T-Mobile’s broadband offerings given the high prices and limited competition for broadband services in rural areas today.”

The filing statement also gave us a look at how the company would structure its broadband business. Sievert said that the New T-Mobile would seek to emulate the Un-carrier approach it uses in the smartphone business. This would mean that customers wouldn’t have to deal with long contract periods.

In terms of speed, Sievert was confident that the New T-Mobile’s 5G service would offer speeds that would, “match or exceed the offerings of most traditional ISPs.”

He did not give any specifics regarding prices, but said that the company’s service would be more affordable than those offered by traditional broadband providers.

Computing

Intel teases mobile 9th-generation Core i9 mobile processors at GDC 2019

Intel teased its new 9th-generation Intel Core i9 processors at GDC 2019. The company offered few specifics about the hardware, but a leak from late February provides insight into what the new processors might offer.
Movies & TV

Disney completes its $71.3 billion purchase of 21st Century Fox

Now that Walt Disney Company has closed its $71.3 billion purchase of 21st Century Fox's movie and television assets, what does this future hold for franchises like X-Men, the Fantastic Four, The Simpsons, and the rest?
Mobile

5G is going to cost you a few bucks more, at least on Verizon

Verizon is in the midst of a massive 5G rollout. In addition to fixed 5G service, it will also begin deploying mobile 5G in the coming months. Here's everything you need to know about Verizon's 5G network and when it will be in your town.
Social Media

Federal investigation digs into Facebook’s data-sharing deals

Facebook confirmed it is cooperating with a federal criminal investigation. According to a report, the company is under investigation for sharing user data with smartphone and tablet companies.
Cars

Can electric cars be S3XY? Tesla says yes with the new Model Y crossover

Tesla introduced a crossover named Model Y at its design studio in Los Angeles. It's a more spacious alternative to the Model 3 it shares 75 percent of its parts with, and is a smaller sibling to the Model X.
Mobile

Jury fines Apple $32 million for infringing on three Qualcomm patents

In a serious blow to Apple in its legal battle against Qualcomm, a San Diego jury fined Apple $32 million for infringing on three Qualcomm-owned patents. The decision marks the latest news in a string of court dates for the two companies.
Mobile

Why premium is the most overused, and least understood, word in tech

Everyone has heard the word premium, and many of us will have purchased a premium product, but what does premium actually mean, and why is it used so much in tech? Here's why it's so popular.
Business

4 women innovators who are using tech to help others live better lives

Meet four women leaders who are not only at the forefront of technology today, but also using tech — from robotics and medicine to food and undergarments — to help others.
Business

Captain Marvel continues to soar at the box office with huge second weekend

Captain Marvel blasted into theaters in a big way a week ago, and Marvel's first female-led solo superhero movie is showing no signs of slowing down after a big second week in theaters.
Business

Bags with brains: Smart luggage and gadgets are making travel smoother

The bag you use to tote your stuff can affect the experience of any trip. In response, suitcases are wising up, and there are now options for smart luggage with scales, tracking, and more. Here are our favorite pieces.
Business

British Airways’ new Club Suite for business class comes with a door

British Airways is going after a bigger slice of the business class market with the imminent launch of the Club Suite. The plush seating option offers a more private space as well as an easier route to the bathroom.
Business

Patreon is having another go at changing the way it charges creators

Patreon messed up pretty badly the last time it tried to change its payment system. Now it's having another go, though this time the changes mainly affect future sign-ups rather than its current community of creators.
Cars

Waymo boosts robo-taxi plans with new service center in Arizona

Waymo has announced plans for a facility in Phoenix, Arizona, that will help to service, maintain, and grow its fleet of autonomous Waymo One cars. The vehicles operate as part of the company's robo-taxi ridesharing service.
Mobile

Google hit with another fine by the EU, this time for $1.7 billion

Google has been fined for the third time by the EU, this time for breaching antitrust laws by requiring third-party websites using its search function to prioritize its ads over competitors.