Tesla reportedly phases out one of its entry-level options, the Model X 60D

tesla model x 60d gone 3v2
Remember when Tesla introduced lower-cost Model S and Model X variants in July, perhaps hoping to draw some buyers from the Model 3 reservation list? Both the Model S 60 and the Model X 60D actually had 75 kWh batteries, but they were software-limited to 60 kWh. Well, the Model S 60 is still available but the Model X 60D is no more, according to Left Lane News.

The lowest-price Model X is now the 75D, which starts at $86,700, including a $1,200 freight charge. Other Model X starting prices, which depend on battery pack capacity, are $96,700 for the 90D and $136,700 for the top-of-the-model-line P100D.

Speculation about the reasons for the entry-level Model X’s disappearance range from a Tesla mystery announcement scheduled for October 17 to possibly just wanting to cut the variety of offerings. It also could be a simple matter of supply and demand.

The Tesla Model X got off to a horrible start. The signature falcon-wing doors did not work well from the start, prompting Tesla CEO Elon Musk to admit an error of hubris — packing too many new features in the Model X. At the Tesla annual shareholders meeting in early June, Musk said getting the door sensors and doors to work correctly was more of a challenge than expected. He predicted it would take two future software upgrades to get the doors to be “fully functioning.”

More recently, however, the Model X doors are working just fine, according to Electrek. Also from Electrek are stories that the Model X is selling exceedingly well in Norway, where it is now the second best-selling car, and in the Netherlands, where Tesla has a final assembly plant and where even the king was recently added a Model X to his fleet. Apparently, the Model X is also extremely popular in mainland China.

So it might be international demand drove Tesla to stop selling the Model X 60D — which did not cost the company any less to manufacture than the more expensive 75D. Or some other reason. The point is, if you want a new Model X, the price sheet starts at $86,700 with shipping.

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