Amazon explains why it dropped WikiLeaks

Amazon Web ServicesAccording to a statement released by Amazon, WikiLeaks’ service was not dropped because of a Denial of Service (DDoS) attack or because of pressure from the U.S. government.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) says in a statement that WikiLeaks broke its terms of service. They write:

“Amazon Web Services (AWS) rents computer infrastructure on a self-service basis. AWS does not pre-screen its customers, but it does have terms of service that must be followed. WikiLeaks was not following them. There were several parts they were violating. For example, our terms of service state that “you represent and warrant that you own or otherwise control all of the rights to the content… that use of the content you supply does not violate this policy and will not cause injury to any person or entity.” It’s clear that WikiLeaks doesn’t own or otherwise control all the rights to this classified content. Further, it is not credible that the extraordinary volume of 250,000 classified documents that WikiLeaks is publishing could have been carefully redacted in such a way as to ensure that they weren’t putting innocent people in jeopardy. Human rights organizations have in fact written to WikiLeaks asking them to exercise caution and not release the names or identities of human rights defenders who might be persecuted by their governments.”

Gizmodo reports that WikiLeaks is now being hosted in the town of Roubaix, France by OVH, one of the largest hosting providers in Europe. This is in addition to WikiLeaks’ Swedish servers which have been hosting the site since last summer.

The latest WikiLeaks release of over 250,000 U.S. documents has received an extremely negative reaction from both Republicans and Democrats and provided endless fodder for T.V. news personalities.

What do you think about Amazon’s decision to drop WikiLeaks from its servers? Tell us in the comments.

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