AMD’s CEO suggests the wait for new Radeon cards will continue

amd intel ces2017 1024px 2007computex day4 ticc
Image Credit: Wikimedia
In Advanced Micro Devices’ quarterly conference call on April 16 with investors and financial analysts, the company announced that it will discuss next-gen GPUs later this quarter. This is quite a bit later than hoped, as earlier rumored at suggested the new Radeons could be rolled out in the early months of 2015. Obviously, that hasn’t happened, and it now seems it won’t happen for another month, maybe two.

CEO Lisa Su said that the company expects its products to take a strong lead in the second half of the year, according to Fudzilla. However, the delay has cleared the path for Nvidia to continue rolling out GPUs without much competition.

“I’ve talked about Carrizo being a strong product for us, I talked about some of our graphics launches that we’ll talk about later this quarter,” Su said on the call, according to Maximum PC. “So from our standpoint, I would say the first half of the year, we had some, let’s call it, some of our issues that we were correcting in terms of the channel, and then a weaker than expected market environment.”

In February 2015, AMD wrote on Facebook that it was “putting the finishing touches” on its Radeon 300 series. This fell in line with rumors that the company was in the midst of completing the certification process for a new graphic board for the company’s Fiji XT GPU, and lead to expectations that a launch would come in response to Nvidia’s new GTX 980.

AMD’s revenue for this past quarter is down 26 percent from the same quarter last year. During the investor call, much of this was blamed on inventory issues. Su promised a stronger second half in 2015 as it begins shipments of new graphics products and accelerated processing units later this quarter. Su also noted that she would like to see some regain of share in both the desktop and notebook markets.

Computing

Nvidia faces attacks from AMD, Intel, and even Google. Should it be worried?

Nvidia announced an expanded array of RTX server solutions designed to leverage the power of ray-tracing at GTC 2019. The effort will help Nvidia take on Google's Stadia in game streaming with GeForce Now, and the company's investments in…
Computing

Intel gives a peek at what its Arctic Sound GPU could look like

A new set of concept images shown at GDC 2019 is providing a peek at what Intel's upcoming modern discrete GPU, code-named. Arctic Sound, could end up looking like when released in 2020.
Computing

How the Google Stadia could lead to a new era of multi-GPU gaming

Google's Stadia could use more than one graphics card to deliver the high-performance visuals it's promised. If that leads to better developer support for multi-GPUs, could that mean gaming with two or more graphics cards could finally be…
Computing

G-Sync and FreeSync can make your games look better, but which is best?

There are some subtle differences between the two adaptive refresh technology offerings, and they affect cost, performance, and compatibility. Nvidia may have released it's feature first, but in recent years AMD has stepped up to the plate…
Computing

Keep your laptop battery in tip-top condition with these handy tips

Learn how to care for your laptop's battery, how it works, and what you can do to make sure yours last for years and retains its charge. Check out our handy guide for valuable tips, no matter what type of laptop you have.
Computing

Is it worth spending more for the Surface Pro, or is the Surface Go good enough?

The Surface Go vs. Surface Pro — which is better? While the higher price tag of one might make you think it's an easy choice, a deeper dive into what each offers makes it a closer race than you might assume.
Computing

Hands-on with Microsoft Chromium Edge: A first look at the early release

We installed a preview of Edge Chromium, and there's now a lot that makes it feel Chrome, but there are also some similarities to the old Edge. So, is the new Chromium Edge the best browser ever? Here's a hands-on look.
Computing

Amazon sale knocks $200 off the price of 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar

If you always wanted to buy a MacBook Pro but found it a bit too expensive, now is your chance to save. A base version of the 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar is currently on sale at Amazon for $1,600.
Computing

Apple’s 4K 21.5-inch iMac is now $200 off if you pre-order it

Apple's new iMacs are now available and if you pre-order one from B&H you can get the midrange version for $200. That's a near 20-percent saving on one of the most competitive configurations.
Emerging Tech

Microsoft’s latest breakthrough could make DNA-based data centers possible

Could tomorrow's data centers possibly store information in the form of synthetic DNA? Researchers from Microsoft have successfully encoded the word "hello" into DNA and then back again.
Computing

Own an Asus computer? Malware might be hiding in your system

If you own an Asus computer, your system might have been infected by malware distributed from the tool you typically use to update the BIOS and install other security patches, according to a new report by cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab.
Computing

The new Windows 10 File Explorer could look like this in 2020

Microsoft may update Windows 10's File Explorer to adopt Fluent Design principles in an upcoming 2020 update. A report suggests that we'll get our first glimpse at the new-look explorer in upcoming Windows Insider builds.
Computing

DisplayPort and HDMI both connect to screens, but here's how they're different

HDMI and DisplayPort are two of the most popular connectors for hooking up consoles, gaming PCs, TVs, and monitors, but which is best? To find out, we pitted HDMI vs. DisplayPort and compared their best and worst features.
Computing

Get a new 2018 Apple MacBook Air for $1,000 with Amazon’s latest sale

Online retailer Amazon is currently running a discount on select models of the MacBook Air 2018. You can bring one home starting at $1,000, a full $200 off the usual selling price.