Broadcom Hoping To Bring NAS Home

With the increase of broadband connections, digital imaging and file sharing, home networks continue to require more storage. Broadcom hopes to tap into that need for storage with their new NAS on chip solution announced today.

Network Attached Storage (NAS) has traditionally been a solution only for businesses, mainly because of the cost. Broadcom’s “NAS on a Chip” (NASoaC) is aimed at both business and home use, and according to the company, will make NAS an affordable reality for networks in need of a centralized storage solution.

The Broadcom BCM7480 NASoaC controller is aimed at consumers, SoHo environments and small businesses where such devices had previously been too expensive or hard to use for the average user. The BCM4780 might change that, by providing a low-cost NAS that doesn’t require software or drivers and is instantly recognized on the network.

Broadcom spokesman Henry Rael said products featuring the NASoaC will be available for consumers in the Q3 2004 time frame and will be much more affordable than today’s solutions. Networked storage based on Broadcom’s chip may cost around $200 including a drive, and about $99 without a hard drive.

The NASoaC design is easy to install and configure because it uses the universal Plug and Play protocol. The system has built-in security features as well as RAID, so it can automatically mirror its contents to another drive, providing additional security and protection of valuable personal and business data.

According to the company, BCM4780-based NAS systems will offer a very simple installation and setup procedure that requires no need for user configuration or knowledge of IP addresses. An auto-discovery feature automatically adds the NAS device to all attached clients upon connection to the network.

For more advanced users, BCM4780-based storage products will offer a full range of powerful security and configuration modes, including enterprise-level features, such as RAID 0, 1 and 10 functionality with support for up to four hard disk drives in a single system.

Each disk drive can be made “hot-swappable,” allowing the user to easily replace or upgrade drives, with built-in features for online repair capability. Data on the drives can also be encrypted, selectively or in total, with real-time encryption powered by a hardware AES (advanced encryption system) engine integrated into the processor.

The chip also features USB connectivity, both as a host and a client, allowing NASoaC based systems to be used as external drives or to act as print servers for USB printers. Also integrated into the chip is both wired and wireless networking, S.M.A.R.T. disk monitoring and a Web-based configuration tool. The chip features embedded Linux on a 300 MHz MIPS32 CPU core.

For more information on the Broadcom NASoaC, visit Broadcom’s Website.

Computing

Old Nvidia graphics cards to get ray tracing support in upcoming driver

Nvidia's RTX ray tracing technology will no longer be limited to RTX graphics cards. An upcoming driver update will add support for low-end ray tracing to GTX 10-series and 16-series graphics cards.
Computing

Make the most of your toner with our five favorite color laser printers

Color laser printers have improved dramatically over the years, and today's models offer both blazing print speeds and great image quality. Here are our favorite color laser printers, from massive all-in-ones to smaller budget options.
Computing

Dodge the cryptojackers with the best torrent clients available today

Looking for the best torrent clients to help you share all of that wonderful legal content you own? Here's a list of our favorite torrent clients, all packed with great features while dodging malware and adverts.
Gaming

How do Nintendo Switch, Xbox One X compare to each other? We find out

The Nintendo Switch is innovative enough to stand apart from traditional consoles, but could it become your primary gaming system? How does the Switch stack up against the Xbox One?
Computing

These are the 6 best -- and free -- antivirus apps to help protect your MacBook

Malware protection is more important than ever, even if you eschew Windows in favor of Apple's desktop platform. Thankfully, protecting your machine is as easy as choosing from the best free antivirus apps for Mac suites.
Computing

Edit, sign, append, and save with six of the best PDF editors

Though there are plenty of PDF editors to be had online, finding a solution with the tools you need can be tough. Here are the best PDF editors for your editing needs, no matter your budget or operating system.
Computing

Apple iMac gets more powerful with new Intel CPUs, Radeon Pro graphics

Apple on Tuesday, March 19 refreshed its iMac lineup with new models featuring slightly more powerful Intel processors and new AMD graphics cards. The new 27-inch 5K model comes with options for Intel's six-core or eight-core ninth-gen…
Cars

Nvidia’s new simulator brings virtual learning to autonomous vehicle developers

Nvidia introduced a simulator for testing autonomous vehicle technologies. Drive Constellation is a cloud-based platform technology vendors can use to validate systems efficiently, safely, and much faster than with vehicles on real roads.
Photography

Paper designs digitize in real time using an Illustrator-connected paper tablet

Love graphic design, but prefer the feel of real paper? The new Moleskine Paper Tablet - Creative Cloud Connected syncs with Adobe Illustrator in real time, turning paper sketches into digital drawings.
Computing

Firefox 66 is here and it will soon block irritating autoplay videos

Do web advertisements have you frustrated? Mozilla is here to help. The latest version of the browser will soon block autoplaying videos by default and will also help make web page scrolling smoother.
Computing

USB4 will be the fastest and most uniform USB standard yet

USB4 is on the horizon and alongside a massive boost in speed it's also unifying with the Thunderbolt 3 standard to help finally create a singular wired connection protocol that all devices can enjoy.
Computing

The U.S. government plans to drop $500M on a ridiculously powerful supercomputer

The U.S. Department of Energy has announced plans to build a $500 million exascale supercomputer by 2021. The project, known as the Aurora supercomputer, is expected to boost research efforts in fields such as public health.
Buying Guides

Apple has powered up its iMac lineup, but which one should you opt for?

With new processors and graphics cards for both the 4K and 5K models, the iMac feels like a good option for creatives again. But which should you buy? Here's our guide to choosing the right Apple all-in-one for your needs.
Product Review

4K and 144Hz? Yup, the Acer Predator XB3 will max out your gaming PC

The Predator XB3 isn’t for the faint of heart. But if you have a system that can push over 100 frames per second in 4K screen resolution, this monster of a monitor might be the perfect match for your overpowered gaming rig.