Want someone to hack a Gmail account? That’ll cost just $130, says report from Dell

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Dell’s SecureWorks arm has published its annual Underground Hacker Markets report (pdf), revealing the latest prices offered by hackers for their goods and services. Dell says this information was gathered by two intelligence analysts from the company’s CISO INTEL Team, who tracked hackers on a number of underground hacker forums and marketplaces scattered across the globe. The report focuses on markets in the Russian underground as well as English-based markets, and covers the third quarter of 2015 to the first quarter of 2016 time frame.

The report reveals that hackers currently charge $129 to hack into popular U.S.-based email accounts such as Gmail, Hotmail, and Yahoo. They’ll also go after corporate email accounts, charging $500 per mailbox. Popular Russian email accounts will cost between $65 and $103 while breaking into popular Ukrainian email accounts will cost $129. Hacking the IP address of a computer user will cost you an extra $90.

Naturally, social websites are also on the price sheet. To break into a social account like Facebook and Twitter based in the United States, customers must fork over $129. That price jumps up to $194 when hackers are tasked to break into popular social websites established in Russia, such as VK.ru and Ok.ru.

If you’re looking for some fake identification, hackers can provide that, too. For $173, you can get a physical counterfeit driver’s license in the U.S., U.K., Germany, and Israel. A physical counterfeit social security card will run you another $140 to $250. Need an entirely new identity? There’s a package that includes a scan of a social security card, a scan of a driver’s license, and a matching utility bill for $90. A physical counterfeit passport for U.S. citizens runs a crazy $3,000 to $10,000.

Surprisingly, getting a credit card is quite cheap. A U.S.-based Visa or MasterCard costs a mere $7 whereas a Classic Visa or MasterCard with Track 1 and Track 2 data runs $15. A Premium Visa or MasterCard with Track 1 and Track 2 data is more expensive, costing $30. Want a Premium American Express card? That runs $30 too as does a Premium Discover card.

Of course, hackers are also offering tools and services for a price. A Remote Access Trojan (RAT) ranges from $5 to $10 a piece, Crypters cost from $80 to $440, and an Angler Exploit Kit costs between $100 to $135. Hacking tutorials range from $20 to $40 for multiple tutorials, and instructions on how to steal data from a website costs $350. DDoS attacks are charged by the hour, by the day, or by the week ranging from $5 to $555. Doxing costs $20.

Finally, getting bank account credentials with money already plugged in seems rather cheap as well. In the U.S., a bank account with $1,000 costs $40 while an account with $2,000 costs $80. There are also accounts with $4,000, $7,000, and $15,000, too costing customers up to $500. Airline and hotel points are up for sale as well, with 200,000 points for a U.S.-based airline costing a mere $60 and 1,000,000 points toward international hotel chains costing $200.

“Prices and goods are not the only way sellers are distinguishing themselves. There also continues to be a focus on salesmanship,” Dell reports. “Compared to the report last year, our security experts noted this time around that many hackers were expanding their working hours to include weekends and even promising to be available 24 hours a day.”

This is the company’s third report, and shows how prices have risen or fallen since 2013. The report also goes into detail about how Russian hackers are ensuring customer happiness by expanding their working hours and using guarantors. It’s an interesting read, so take a peek.

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