Track your favorite Game of Thrones character on this interactive map of Westeros

Game of Thrones features a lot of characters (dozens of them are dead, but even more remain living) and those characters travel to a lot of different places across a vast and expansive world. Keeping track of all that can be quite difficult, so an interactive map showing you what everyone is doing and where they are at various points in the story would be very useful.

There have been a few of those available online for a while now, with HBO releasing an official one along the way, but accessing them on your smartphone was never too easy. Now though, it’s a cinch, as there’s an finally an app-based guide to Westeros and beyond.

Developed by miniMapps, the interactive map shows you all of the continents of Westeros and Essos in their entirety, with important locations listed, details of how they relate to the story, and who is where at any given time. Better yet, you can “recap” an episode after watching and it will show you all of the locations for the key scenes.

Updated every week with new additions as the show airs, the map can help you keep on top of the action in what is becoming an increasingly complicated and convoluted show.

Admittedly the map is a little simplistic looking, utilizing vector graphics to make it work on all sorts of devices not just the latest smartphones, but it is relatively detailed. You can zoom in all the way down to individual cities, or right out to view the world as a whole.

Each of those locations you visit have detailed breakdowns of what’s gone on there, offering a bit of history as well as synopsis of each scene that takes place there during the show.

The free version of the app does come with adverts that pop up occasionally, but that is understandable. However, if you would prefer to pay up front, a dollar secures you the full version with all future updates, without adverts.

Grab the app for free on the Google Play Store or the App Store.

Do you think this will make it easier to keep track of where everyone is on the show in relation to each other? Leave your thoughts in the comments.

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