Skip to main content

Gigabyte inadvertently confirms 12GB Nvidia RTX 2060 Super rumors

When rumors of a 12GB Nvidia RTX 2060 Super refresh started making the rounds, we said that they probably weren’t true. But it looks like we may have been wrong. Graphics card maker Gigabyte filed a new listing with the Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC) that inadvertently confirms this card’s existence..

Twitter user @momomo_us uncovered the listing, which lists four Gigabyte graphics cards. Although the listing doesn’t call out the 12GB RTX 2060 Super by name, the model numbers all line up with previous Gigabyte RTX 2060 cards, with one notable change — 12GB of RAM. The GV-N2060WF2OC-6GD (Gigabyte’s Windforce RTX 2060), for example, is listed as GV-N2060WF2OC-12GD.

Nvidia RTX 2060 Super and RTX 2070 Super review
Dan Baker/Digital Trends

The listing comes amid mounting evidence for a refresh to Nvidia’s last-gen card. On November 14, a day before the listing went live, YouTube channel Gamers Nexus published a video saying that a 12GB RTX 2060 Super was on the way. This isn’t a channel that normally leaks new releases, but that, combined with the ECC filing and murmurs from around the community, has an 12GB RTX 2060 Super looking likely.

A dedicated leaking channel, Moore’s Law is Dead, revealed in October that the card would arrive in 2022 to take on low-end AMD RDNA 2 graphics cards. Rumors of Nvidia reintroducing the RTX 2060 in some form date back to January 2021, and they haven’t stopped since.

Get your weekly teardown of the tech behind PC gaming
Check your inbox!

The question: Why? Nvidia released the RTX 3080 more than a year ago, so it’s a strange move to resurrect a GPU that’s more than two years old. There could be a good reason to bring it back, though. It’s no secret that graphics cards are tough to find right now, and Nvidia could be splitting its manufacturing efforts to get more cards out in the wild.

Evidence of the GPU shortage emerged when it was revealed that Nvidia was having manufacturing yield issues with its RTX 30-series graphics cards. Nvidia chose Samsung as its manufacturing partner, and reports circulating shortly after the launch showed that the manufacturer produced fewer usable chips than expected.

Samsung didn’t build the RTX 2060 Super — chipmaker TSMC did. TSMC is the semiconductor company behind AMD’s Ryzen 5000 processors and Radeon RX 6000 graphics cards, as well as a longtime partner for Nvidia. It looks like Nvidia could be splitting its manufacturing to bypass supply chain issues.

That’s something the company did with its GTX 10-series GPUs. The range started on TSMC’s 16nm manufacturing process, but Nvidia eventually moved to Samsung’s 14nm process. Reintroducing the RTX 2060 Super allows Nvidia to quickly produce new cards on a node the company is already familiar with.

The strange bit is the 12GB of video memory. The RTX 2060 Super originally launched with 6GB, and doubling that to 12GB probably won’t do much for gaming performance. That’s something Nvidia’s RTX 3060 proved — even with 12GB of video memory, which is more than the RTX 3080, it performs below other cards in the range.

Unfortunately, an RTX 2060 Super refresh may not be enough to alleviate supply chain issues. Nvidia has been clear that it expects the GPU shortage to continue throughout 2022, so hunting down a graphics card will continue to be a practice in patience.

It’s also possible that the 12GB RTX 2060 Super won’t ever see the light of day. Although multiple sources have confirmed the existence of the card, it’s possible that Nvidia has shelved the idea. That’s something Nvidia already did with the 20GB RTX 3080 Ti, which was reportedly canned earlier this year.

Editors' Recommendations

Jacob Roach
Lead Reporter, PC Hardware
Jacob Roach is the lead reporter for PC hardware at Digital Trends. In addition to covering the latest PC components, from…
The RTX 4090 is past its prime, and that’s OK
Nvidia GeForce RTX 4090 GPU.

In October 2022, when I first reviewed the RTX 4090, I called it "both a complete waste of money and the most powerful graphics card ever made." That's even more true now that it was more than a year ago. The AI boom shortly after the launch of the RTX 4090, combined with some international restrictions on the GPU, has caused prices to skyrocket to unattainable places, moving the affordability from unlikely to basically impossible.

But that's changing. Reports indicate that prices are slowly dropping, moving from a high of $2,200 down to around $2,000. That's still way above the GPU's list price of $1,600, but the trajectory now is at least positive.

Read more
Using an RTX 3060? Here’s the GPU to upgrade to next
EVGA RTX 3060 sitting on a table.

Nvidia's RTX 3060 is a certified legend. It's the most popular graphics card in gaming PCs, according to the Steam hardware survey, and that makes sense. For gamers playing at 1080p, you can't ask for more than what the RTX 3060 offers between its low price, 12GB of VRAM, and features like Nvidia's Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS).

But where do you go from there? If you picked up an RTX 3060 over the last couple of years and you're looking to take your PC gaming to the next level, I rounded up the best GPUs to upgrade to from the RTX 3060.

Read more
All RTX GPUs now come with a local AI chatbot. Is it any good?
A window showing Nvidia's Chat with RTX.

It's been difficult to justify packing dedicated AI hardware in a PC. Nvidia is trying to change that with Chat with RTX, which is a local AI chatbot that leverages the hardware on your Nvidia GPU to run an AI model.

It provides a few unique advantages over something like ChatGPT, but the tool still has some strange problems. There are the typical quirks you get with any AI chatbot here, but also larger issues that prove Chat with RTX needs some work.
Meet Chat with RTX
Here's the most obvious question about Chat with RTX: How is this different from ChatGPT? Chat with RTX is a local large language model (LLM). It's using TensorRT-LLM compatible models -- Mistral and Llama 2 are included by default -- and applying them to your local data. In addition, the actual computation is happening locally on your graphics card, rather than in the cloud. Chat with RTX requires an Nvidia RTX 30-series or 40-series GPU and at least 8GB of VRAM.

Read more