Google starts testing device syncing for Chrome

Included in the beta test of Google Chrome 19, the next major release of the Web browser will include the ability to sync open tabs between different devices. Assuming that the user has the browser open on both devices and is logged in with the same profile, they can access all open pages by clicking the new “Other Devices” option in the bottom right hand corner of a new tab page. For instance, if a user is reading a particular article or series of articles on a work computer, they can open up the tab on a laptop, desktop or tablet located at home without having to type in the URL or search for each page. 

Chrome_Desktop_Beta_Android_SyncIn addition to pulling up the current URL within the tab, the syncing process also brings over page history as well. Users can navigate backward and forward through the tab’s history and current tabs that are open on the device won’t be closed when the new “Other Devices” tab is launched.

Beyond the new tab sync feature within Chrome 19, the beta version of the software includes a smattering of bug fixes and performance tweaks. Issues with 3D graphics on NVIDIA GPUs has been fixed as well as errors with incognito windows.

Regarding desktop to mobile syncing, Google is working on a solution that will be built into Chrome 20. If a user has pulled up directions to a new restaurant on a desktop computer, but forgotten to print out the details, they could bring up the directions immediately on a synced Android 4.0 mobile phone.

This feature will replace the Google Chrome to Phone extension that’s currently available on the Chrome Web Store. Google is also expected to include updates to Native Client, a solution for high-end gaming through the Web browser, within Chrome 19 and Chrome 20. 

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