Leak claims Nvidia’s Titan X will be almost as quick as the Titan Z, at a third of the price.

leak claims nvidias titan x will be as quick the z at a third of price nvidia
As we all know by now, last week Nvidia decided to take the opportunity at GDC to unveil the existence of its newest super-powered card, the Titan X.

Called “the most advanced GPU the world has ever seen” by the company’s CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang, at the tail-end of Epic’s Unreal Engine panel, the company was unwilling to share anything beyond a sneak peak at what we can expect. He said that the X would run on a stunning 8 billion transistors with 12GB of available onboard RAM, and left it at that.

Now, the enthusiast website Videocardz.com claims to have grabbed the leaked specs, and says the Titan X will come stacked with 3,072 CUDA cores clocked at 1,002MHz. (the boost potential is still unknown), 12GB of GDDR5 VRAM clocked at 1,750MHz, and a 384-bit memory bus resulting in 336GB/s of bandwidth. Interestingly, it does not appear to be a multi-GPU card, so it’s a successor to the old Titan rather than the dual-chip Titan Z.

These specs would put it somewhere in between the capabilities of the Titan Black series and the Titan Z, which we got the chance to review last month while taking Northwest Falcon’s mini-tower Tiki Z for a test drive.

Videcardz.com has a long history of knowing what’s going to be in these cards before anyone else, and here’s to hoping they’re right about the Titan X. To make details of the leak even sweeter the site didn’t just publish the specs, but also the pricing.

The author of the revealing article says we should be ready to shell out just shy of a grand ($999). That’s a lot of money, but it’s in line with previous single-chip Titan video cards.

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