LulzSec calls it quits after 50 days of hacks

Lulzsec-hackers-quit-finished

Only a little more than a month and a half ago, the merry pranksters of Lulz Security began their quest to wreak havoc on the computer systems of the world, all in the name of lulz. Today, that anarchic campaign has come to an abrupt end. The group announced via a statement posted to Pastebin that it will permanently disband, dropping the Lulz Boat anchor for good. As a parting gift, LulzSec also released a trove of data stolen from companies like AOL and AT&T, evidence that the group hacked the website of the US Navy, plus a variety of other illicit goodies.

“For the past 50 days we’ve been disrupting and exposing corporations, governments, often the general population itself, and quite possibly everything in between, just because we could,” writes LulzSec. “All to selflessly entertain others – vanity, fame, recognition, all of these things are shadowed by our desire for that which we all love. The raw, uninterrupted, chaotic thrill of entertainment and anarchy.”

The group confirmed its retirement on the LulzSec Twitter feed, which managed to amass 277,540 followers during its short stint online.

During its 50-day stint of digital escapades, LulzSec hacked PBS.org, a variety of websites owned by Sony, Nintendo, FBI affiliate Infragard Atlanta, 50+ porn sites, Bethesda software, 4Chan.org, CIA.gov, Senate.gov and a variety of law enforcement agencies in Arizona.

LulzSec’s statement goes on to explain that, like “Hitler and Osama bin Laden,” they are people, too. “People with a preference for music, a preference for food; we have varying taste in clothes and television, we are just like you,” says the group.

In what appears to be an attempt to explain the non-lulz motivation behind its most high-profile hack — this week’s release of hundreds of classified and/or private data from Arizona law enforcement as a protest of its strict immigration law, and other moves related to the joint LulzSec-Anonymous “AntiSec” campaign — LulzSec says that its members “truly believe” in that cause — so strongly, in fact, that they “brought it back, much to the dismay of those looking for more anarchic lulz.”

While the group says that the brief duration of its existence was planned from the beginning, some have already begun to argue that the pressure on LulzSec simply became too much for them to handle. And they might have a point. In the past two weeks alone, Scotland Yard arrested a 19-year-old with ties to the group; hacker group Web Ninjas published names, photos and other personal data related to people it claims are members of LulzSec; and another hacker group, TeaMp0isoN, defaced the website of an alleged LulzSec member.

Regardless of its reason for throwing in the towel, the group adds this as its final bon voyage: “We must now sail into the distance, leaving behind – we hope – inspiration, fear, denial, happiness, approval, disapproval, mockery, embarrassment, thoughtfulness, jealousy, hate, even love. If anything, we hope we had a microscopic impact on someone, somewhere. Anywhere.”

“LulzSec” may be done. But something tells us that the people behind its shenanigans are far from finished. Stay tuned.

Read LulzSec’s full statement:

Friends around the globe,

We are Lulz Security, and this is our final release, as today marks something meaningful to us. 50 days ago, we set sail with our humble ship on an uneasy and brutal ocean: the Internet. The hate machine, the love machine, the machine powered by many machines. We are all part of it, helping it grow, and helping it grow on us.

For the past 50 days we’ve been disrupting and exposing corporations, governments, often the general population itself, and quite possibly everything in between, just because we could. All to selflessly entertain others – vanity, fame, recognition, all of these things are shadowed by our desire for that which we all love. The raw, uninterrupted, chaotic thrill of entertainment and anarchy. It’s what we all crave, even the seemingly lifeless politicians and emotionless, middle-aged self-titled failures. You are not failures. You have not blown away. You can get what you want and you are worth having it, believe in yourself.

While we are responsible for everything that The Lulz Boat is, we are not tied to this identity permanently. Behind this jolly visage of rainbows and top hats, we are people. People with a preference for music, a preference for food; we have varying taste in clothes and television, we are just like you. Even Hitler and Osama Bin Laden had these unique variations and style, and isn’t that interesting to know? The mediocre painter turned supervillain liked cats more than we did.

Again, behind the mask, behind the insanity and mayhem, we truly believe in the AntiSec movement. We believe in it so strongly that we brought it back, much to the dismay of those looking for more anarchic lulz. We hope, wish, even beg, that the movement manifests itself into a revolution that can continue on without us. The support we’ve gathered for it in such a short space of time is truly overwhelming, and not to mention humbling. Please don’t stop. Together, united, we can stomp down our common oppressors and imbue ourselves with the power and freedom we deserve.

So with those last thoughts, it’s time to say bon voyage. Our planned 50 day cruise has expired, and we must now sail into the distance, leaving behind – we hope – inspiration, fear, denial, happiness, approval, disapproval, mockery, embarrassment, thoughtfulness, jealousy, hate, even love. If anything, we hope we had a microscopic impact on someone, somewhere. Anywhere.

Thank you for sailing with us. The breeze is fresh and the sun is setting, so now we head for the horizon.

Let it flow…

Lulz Security – our crew of six wishes you a happy 2011, and a shout-out to all of our battlefleet members and supporters across the globe

Computing

AMD Ryzen and Nvidia GTX join forces in HP Pavilion laptops and desktops

The HP Pavilion range has two new entries that are perfect for anyone looking for their first dedicated gaming system but don't have a fortune to spend. You even get AMD and Nvidia hardware in the same system.
Computing

The best Chromebook deals available in August 2019

Whether you want a compact laptop to enjoy some entertainment on the go, or you need a no-nonsense machine for school or work, we've smoked out the best cheap Chromebook deals -- from full-sized laptops to 2-in-1 convertibles -- that won't…
Deals

The 2018 Apple iPad Pro Wi-Fi tablet gets a huge $124 discount on Amazon

If you have been holding off on buying the Apple iPad Pro because of its price, now is the time. The best tablet for 2019 gets a $124 discount on Amazon today. This deal is more affordable than the one we previously found.
Computing

Stuck in ELO hell? HP’s A.I. coach wants to help Omen owners become better gamers

HP has an exciting new update for its Omen Command Center software: A.I. coaching driven by machine learning. It uses the power of A.I. and analytics to figure out where you can best improve in your favorite game.
Computing

Visually stunning HP Omen X 27 HDR TN display closes color gap with IPS monitors

The HP Omen X 27 could prove to be the sweet spot for gamers everywhere. At a 1440p resolution, it's blazingly fast, with a 240Hz refresh rate and a 1ms response time. Better yet, its HDR support really helps colors pop.
Computing

Windows Core OS: Everything you need to know

Known as Windows Core OS, a new version of Windows will be a single universal operating system for all kinds of devices. It's expected to look very different, and here's what we know.
Computing

From Air to Pro, here are the best MacBook deals for August 2019

If you’re in the market for a new Apple laptop, let us make your work a little easier: We hunted down the best up-to-date MacBook deals available online right now from various retailers.
Computing

The best web browsers for 2019

Choosing a web browser for surfing the web can be tough with all the great options available. Here we pit the latest versions of Chrome, Opera, Firefox, Edge, and Vivaldi against one another to find the best browsers for most users.
Computing

Microsoft’s new Chromium Edge browser has entered beta. Here’s how to get it

Microsoft's Chromium-based Edge browser has been downloaded over 1 million times. In this guide, we'll explain how you can download and install the browser on your PC or Mac in just a few quick and simple steps.
Computing

Dell Latitude 7400 2-in-1 vs. ThinkPad X1 Yoga

The Dell Latitude 7400 2-in-1 and the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga Gen 4 are both well-built and equipped business 2-in-1s. Which is better comes down to their displays and battery life advantages.
Computing

The best portable monitors for 2019

Portable monitors are smaller displays that can fit inside backpacks or cases. They're great picks for gaming sessions, extra screens on your desk, and more. Find the best portable monitors with our helpful list!
Computing

AMD Threadripper 3: Everything we know so far

AMD's third-generation Ryzen CPUs are amazingly capable, but what about the 3000-series Threadripper CPUs? Those are coming down the pipe and quite possible quicker than anyone expected.
Deals

You can get this XPS 15 laptop for over $500 off with Dell’s latest deal

You can now grab a 2018 Dell XPS 15 laptop with 1TB of solid-state drive storage and 32GB of RAM at a steep discount. This discount knocks more than $500 off of its initial $2,200 price tag.
Deals

Amazon drops the price for the Fire HD 10 Tablet with hands-free Alexa

The Fire HD 10 Tablet has always been an astonishingly good buy in comparison to iPads. Amazon just sweetened the deal with a significant price drop for the versatile hands-free Alexa-compatible 1080p tablet in a pre-Labor Day sale.