Intel COO Brian Krzanich to replace CEO Paul Otellini

brian-krzanich_1Starting May 16, current Intel COO Brian Krzanich will take over Paul Otellini’s role as the company’s CEO, marking the sixth CEO in Intel’s 45-year history. Back in November, Otellini announced his intent to leave Intel this May after being with the company for nearly 40 years, during which he served in the capacity of a CEO for almost 8.

“Brian is a strong leader with a passion for technology and deep understanding of the business,” Intel said in a press release. “He has the right combination of knowledge, depth and experience to lead the company during this period of rapid technology and industry change.” Krzanich along with Stacy Smith and Renee James, two other top contenders for the job, were named executive vice presidents when Otellini revealed his departure in November. But it was Krzanich, who joined the company in 1982 as a process engineer and became COO in January 2012, who was unanimously elected as CEO by the company’s board of directors. Renee James, on the other hand, was named as Intel’s new president and will also step into her new role on May 16.

We assume one of Krzanich’s main objectives the moment he takes over is to make sure the company can compete in the increasingly expanding mobile sector. While Intel remains a top chipmaker, a lot of mobile device manufacturers continue to prefer more affordable and more energy-efficient ARM-based processors. In fact, the company will launch a new version of its Atom processor meant for low-powered devices like smartphones and tablets on May 6. In addition to Atom, Intel is reportedly also planning a June launch for its Haswell processor, which will power Windows Ultrabooks as well as (according to rumors) MacBooks and Chromebooks.

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