Open Sesame: Voice-activated USB only opens on your command

Open Sesame Voice-activated USB only opens on your command

Let’s face it: we all have “sensitive” files that we would go to great lengths to protect. But rather than bury your secrets deep within the recesses of your computer or slapping on some intricate password you’ll probably forget, why not take it one step further (and more awesome) with this ultra-cool voice-activated USB thumb drive?

This USB thumb drive keeps all your most sensitive material, and even stuff you don’t particularly care about, safe and sound – with an emphasis on the sound part. Files loaded onto the drive will literally open upon hearing your voice, and your voice alone. Even if someone does manage to overhear your password, it won’t matter. The USB drive is designed to specifically hear and recognize your voice’s specific frequencies and nuances.

The 8-GB drive has a built-in microphone, and utilizes advanced voice recognition software to protect your files and authenticate that it is indeed you speaking your secret password. Interestingly — and somewhat unfortunately — there is a workaround to the voice recognition in case you suffered a severe spell of laryngitis or were unable to speak for some reason, but that seems to somewhat defeat the purpose of a voice-protected thumb drive. Although, we imagine it would probably prove useful in a bind.

Moreover, the voice-activated USB doesn’t require any installation, so you get all the sophistication of the voice recognition technology without having to go through the hassle of installing any annoying software.

If you’re interested in unlocking your secret files with the sound of your voice, you can purchase the voice authenticating drive for $50 at Hammacher Schlemmer.

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