3D-printed dresses, an incompetent barista for your kitchen and more in this week’s Staff Picks

Digital Trends Staff Picks

andrew coutsAndrew Couts: Remembering the Wild, Wild Web

The Web is alive. Once a cacophonous jumble of bustling forums, flashing Geocities pages, and grimy subculture underbellies, the Web of today exists mostly above ground. Even the dark corners that have survived can be exposed to the sunlight of public scrutiny with a single tweet. But the Web’s transformation is far from finished. As University of Maine communications and journalism assistant professor Michael J. Socolow writes in The Chronicle of Higher Education, “We are at a pivotal moment in the Web’s evolution.” The economy of advertising on the Web is changing. Because of this, the Web’s open nature is gradually succumbing to paywalls and walled gardens. “The free-content gravy train is quickly breaking down,” he writes. “The Web is starting to feel constricted and channeled as each new gate and tollbooth appears.” And some day, we will tell our children about the Web that we know today, a Web that will no longer be. So take notes – because sometime in the not-too-distance future, now will be known as the good old days.

Wild Web

natt garunGoodbye, Project Runway; In the future, we’ll 3D print our own dresses

The rise of 3D printing has been a fun phenomenon to watch, but for the most part, I haven’t seen anyone outside of the tech realm particularly swayed to buy 3D-printed iPhone cases over traditional kinds. And there isn’t exactly a booming general consumer market for 3D-printed mugs, guitars, and or board-game pieces. 

This line of 3D-printed dresses from Paris Fashion Week, however, may just change attitudes. A collaboration between Dutch designer Iris van Herpen and Belgian-based manufacturer Materialise, these flexible, soft dresses feature incredible details you won’t ever find in a fabric print. The printed effect also helps the dress create its shape and form, constructing a shell-like volume designers often struggle to achieve with traditional fabric. Sure, each dress probably costs upward of $10,000, but I couldn’t help but imagine: What if the future of 3D printing means fashion designers will eventually sell their dress blueprints online so people at home can 3D print their own wardrobe? No more awkwardly trying on clothes at the mall, no returns and exchanges, no complaining that the dress doesn’t come in your preferred color. You can also print the same dress in a different size if you gain or lose weight, or manage to damage the first version. That hopeful future may be light years away from ever becoming affordable, but I’ll hold out hope for getting my grandchild a 3D-printed prom dress one day.

3D printed dress

Jennifer BergenOoh la la! The world’s first computer art was titillating filth

Porn today is very different from the early days of Playboy in the early 50s. Sixty years later, fewer and fewer dirty mags are being hidden under the mattress as more people favor hard drives for their XXX collection. Though porn on computers is nothing new, we were surprised to find out that provocative images on computer screens actually date back to 1956. when an anonymous IBM employee took the artwork of a naked lady from an Esquire calendar and turned her into the world’s first instance of computer art. In a must-read Atlantic article by Benj Edwards, we learn that the pinup girl “was programmed as a series of short lines, or vectors, encoded on a stack of about 97 Hollerith type punched cards.”

The two U.S. Military-owned computers that read this stack of cards cost $189 million each (in today’s dollars), and took up half an acre of space. We can only imagine what the men working on these mammoth-sized computers would think of today’s $35 credit-card-sized Raspberry Pi computer. We salute this mysterious IBM programmer and pioneer of what was essentially the world’s first instance of computer porn. Make sure to check out the Atlantic article for the full story.

Computer porn


instagram idiocy marshmallows or the moon and staff picks les shuDon’t try to get to know me, just make me my coffee, dammit

There is something about my name that confuses the hell out of all Starbucks baristas. It’s three letters and relatively easy to say, yet I either have to repeat it three times or spell it out. Even that only works only about 40 percent of the time. After years of seeing Liz, Lez, Wes, Jess, and what appears to be Klingon language written on my cups, I’ve just resorted to calling myself Bob. Perhaps I’m the butt of some inside joke that takes place inside every Starbucks. But, as this recent Saturday Night Live sketch proves, I am not the only one who’s had to go through this ordeal.

In this “commercial” for the new Starbucks Verismo home coffee maker, one of the functions mentioned is a built-in voice feature that calls out your name when your drink is ready. Hilariously, the machine gets the name wrong, as well as the beverage. The machine then communicates with the Verquonica, a device designed for the sole purpose of talking trash with the Verismo about the customer. I’ll admit that the sketch is not P.C. – it’s probably borderline racist – but those of us who have had to endure having our name mangled by Starbucks employees can take comfort in knowing that we aren’t the only ones.

caleb denisonCaleb Denison: Baby you can drive my car

Recently, Digital Trends published a piece proposing that the safety tech built into cars is making us worse drivers. I’ll admit that I agree with the majority of what the author has to say, but I also feel compelled to point out that there are some hazardous driving situations we are occasionally confronted with which humans simply can’t anticipate, or react to quickly enough to handle safely.

There’s a reason we don’t use slide rules anymore, folks: Computers are exponentially faster and more efficient than humans at processing mathematically complex problems. Along the same lines, machines are capable of accomplishing certain physical tasks with the sort of speed and precision humans are incapable of. And when we pair computers with machines, sometimes what we get is a mechanism that will save our ass in those moments when we are incapable of saving it ourselves.

Case in point: Volvo’s new CW-EB system (Collision Warning with Emergency Brake). You could have the visual acuity of an eagle and the reflexes of Bruce Lee, but you would still be unable to avoid certain collision scenarios – especially if you have several tons of cargo on your back. Those situations make Volvo’s new tech invaluable and necessary. In the video below, you’ll see how quickly a large truck is able to come to a stop once the CW-EB detects trouble. Check out how close the truck gets every time. It’s wince-inducing, and awesome.

 

Gaming

Get some bang for your buck with these Nintendo Switch console deals at Walmart

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are in the past, but you can still get some bang for your buck on game consoles before the holiday season is done. Walmart has various Nintendo Switch bundles on sale right now.
Computing

Having enough RAM is important, but stick to these guidelines to save some money

Although not quite as exciting as processors and graphics cards, RAM is one of the most important parts of your PC. Not having enough can hurt performance. So, how much RAM do you need?
Computing

Turn your desk into a command center with the best ultrawide monitors

Top of the line ultrawide monitors have the deepest curves, the sharpest colors, and the biggest screens on the market. You’re going to want one, sooner or later. So why not sooner? These are the best ultrawide monitors you can buy now.
Emerging Tech

Feast your eyes on the wildest, most elaborate Rube Goldberg machines ever built

Want to see something totally mesmerizing? Check out several of the best Rube Goldberg machines from across the internet, including one that serves cake and other that do ... nothing particularly useful.
Emerging Tech

The 20 best tech toys for kids will make you wish you were 10 again

Looking for the perfect toy or gadget for your child? Thankfully, we've rounded up some of our personal favorite tech toys, including microscopes, computer kits, and a spherical droid from a galaxy far, far away.
Emerging Tech

Scoot your commute! Here are the 9 best electric scooters on the market

Electric scooters are an affordable, convenient way to minimize your carbon footprint and zip around town. Check out 8 of our current favorites, whether you're working with a budget or have some cash to spare.
Features

Has Columbus, Ohio raised its IQ yet? A progress report from the mayor

Two years ago, the city of Columbus in Ohio received $40 million to pursue smart city initiatives. So, what’s happened since then? We spoke with its mayor, Andrew Ginther, to discuss progress and what’s ahead.
Emerging Tech

Sick of walking everywhere? Here are the best electric skateboards you can buy

Thanks for Kickstarter and Indiegogo, electric skateboards are carving a bigger niche than you might think. Whether you're into speed, mileage, or something a bit more stylish, here are the best electric skateboards on the market.
Emerging Tech

Hear the sounds of wind on Mars from InSight’s latest audio recording

NASA's InSight craft has captured the sound of the wind blowing on the surface of Mars. The audio file was picked up by the air pressure sensor and the seismometer which detected vibrations from the 10 to 15 mph winds in the area.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Folding canoes and ultra-fast water filters

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Emerging Tech

New experiment casts doubt on claims to have identified dark matter

A South Korean experiment called COSINE-100 has attempted to replicate the claims of dark matter observed by the Italian DAMA/LIBRA experiment, but has failed to replicate the observations.
Emerging Tech

White dwarf star unexpectedly emitting bright ‘supersoft’ X-rays

NASA's Chandra Observatory has discovered a white dwarf star which is emitting supersoft X-rays, calling into question the conventional wisdom about how X-rays are produced by dying stars.
Business

Amazon scouted airport locations for its cashier-free Amazon Go stores

Representatives of Amazon Go checkout-free retail stores connected with officials at Los Angeles and San Jose airports in June to discuss the possibility of cashier-free grab-and-go locations in busy terminals.
Emerging Tech

Full-fledged drone delivery service set to land in remote Canadian community

Some drone delivery operations seem rather crude in their execution, but Drone Delivery Canada is building a comprehensive platform that's aiming to take drone delivery to the next level.