Zoom down the streets on your new Blink S electric skateboard from Acton

It may be a retro hobby, but this new skateboard is all new tech. Following one of the most successful Indiegogo campaigns in the crowdfunding platform’s history, electric skateboard designer and manufacturer Acton has begun shipping its Blink S board. The skateboard raised more than $1.4 million in funding last year, and now, skating enthusiasts from around the world have renewed reason to rejoice.

Promising a top speed of up to 15 mph and a battery life that will last you seven miles, the Blink claims to be the “perfect rideable for city dwellers [and] college students.” You can charge the skateboard in as little as an hour, and the hub motors promise a powerful yet smooth ride. Speaking of hub motors, the Blink will still work as a conventional skateboard even if you run out of juice, as these sorts of motors don’t slow you down in the way belted motors might.

With an aircraft aluminum extrusion and a wood deck, the Blink S is super lightweight and portable. The board also comes with a remote control that allows you to control the forward and reverse functions, and also doubles as an accelerator and brake. So really, all you need to do is keep your balance.

And of course, because this is a smart, connected board, it comes with an app that allows you to set modes, check mileage, track routes, and otherwise stay engaged in the skateboarding community. You can now order the Blink S for $699 on the Acton Online Store.

If you’re in the market for other skateboards, however, Acton has a couple more products in the pipeline. There’s the Blink S2, which features two-wheel drive, which allows for “effortless uphill power” for your hillier commutes (the Blink S has one-wheel drive). And the most powerful of the lot is the Blink Qu4tro, which offers an impressive four-wheel drive to adventurers. These two boards are expected to start shipping in the coming months, so keep your eyes peeled.

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