Alpine Readies Head Unit Adapter For iPod

The Alpine Interface Adapter for iPod (model KCA-420i) enables users to experience superior sound quality and control of their iPod music using any of Alpine’s 2004 Ai-Net in-dash head units. The KCA-420i will ship early this fall for a target retail price of $100. Alpine currently offers 11 compatible Ai-Net head units.

Alpine’s Interface Adapter for iPod enables drivers to use the in-dash receiver’s Bass Engine technologies to experience better sound quality and control of their digital music files in the car. The solution allows users to control iPod playback using the head unit’s front panel buttons or remote; view song information (artist, album and/or song name) on the display; and easily find tracks through the receiver’s Quick Search interface. Alpine also says that their MediaXpander technology restores lost detail to compressed digital media, bringing essence and life back to the music as the artist had originally intended.


The Alpine Interface Adapter lets you control your iPod from your car stereo’s head unit.

The Alpine Interface Adapter for iPod is a hide-away design and can be installed anywhere in the vehicle – under a seat, in the glove box or behind the dash. A single cable connects the adapter to the Alpine head unit, while a second cable connects the adapter to the iPod through the iPod dock connector. The iPod then acts like a plug and play hard drive controlled by Alpine¹s easy-to-use rotary knob control. When the vehicle is on, the Interface Adapter also charges the iPod’s internal battery.

The Alpine Interface Adapter for iPod will be available through Alpine Authorized Dealers early this fall for $100 and is compatible with any iPod mini (firmware version 1.1) and iPod (firmware version 2.2) with a dock connector.  Alpine’s 2004 Ai-Net head units, sold separately, are available through authorized dealers at target retail prices starting at $200.  

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